46 - How Big Is Jutland?

Although you probably instantly recognise its shape on a map, you may be forgiven for never having heard of Jutland. This northern European peninsula is not an independent entitiy: it’s divided between Denmark, which occupies the northern two thirds of what Danes call Jylland, and Germany in the south of Jütland.


\n

Apart from the relative obscurity of its name, Jutland also suffers from  geographic vagueness. How big is Jutland? This simple question does not have a simple answer, as the limits of what is ‘Jutland’ vary greatly… 

\n

jutland1.JPG

\n

\n
\n

The area coloured red denotes ‘minimalist’ Jutland, consisting of that area of Denmark which is truly continental. This definition is correct, but not widespread.

\n

\n

\n

Red and pink areas together define the most common definition of Jutland: all Danish territory north of the German border – including the Norrejyske Oe (in pink), which was separated from the mainland after a storm in 1825. This area covers almost 30.000 km² (about as big as Belgium) and is home to 2,5 million Danes.

\n

The red area includes Northern Schleswig, which was returned to Denmark after a plebiscite in 1920. The area is also known as Sonderjylland (‘southern Jutland’). In the same plebiscite,
\nSouthern Schleswig chose to remain German. Some definitions of Sonderjylland however do include the whole of historical Schleswig, which is bordered in the south by the
Eider River.

\n

The ‘maximalist’ definition of Jutland includes all areas which at one time were Danish possessions: not only Schleswig, but also Holstein (in yellow), which is bounded in the south by the Elbe river. Both former duchies now form the German Bundesland of Schleswig-Holstein, which borders Hamburg. This city is referred to on Danish road signs as Hamborg – which may of may not be an expression of some deep-seated irredentist yearning for Greater Jutland

\n
\n\n

'Upstreamism': Your zip code affects your health as much as genetics

Upstreamism advocate Rishi Manchanda calls us to understand health not as a "personal responsibility" but a "common good."

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Upstreamism tasks health care professionals to combat unhealthy social and cultural influences that exist outside — or upstream — of medical facilities.
  • Patients from low-income neighborhoods are most at risk of negative health impacts.
  • Thankfully, health care professionals are not alone. Upstreamism is increasingly part of our cultural consciousness.
Keep reading Show less

Meet the Bajau sea nomads — they can reportedly hold their breath for 13 minutes

The Bajau people's nomadic lifestyle has given them remarkable adaptions, enabling them to stay underwater for unbelievable periods of time. Their lifestyle, however, is quickly disappearing.

Wikimedia Commons
Culture & Religion
  • The Bajau people travel in small flotillas throughout the Phillipines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, hunting fish underwater for food.
  • Over the years, practicing this lifestyle has given the Bajau unique adaptations to swimming underwater. Many find it straightforward to dive up to 13 minutes 200 feet below the surface of the ocean.
  • Unfortunately, many disparate factors are erasing the traditional Bajau way of life.
Keep reading Show less

Golden blood: The rarest blood in the world

We explore the history of blood types and how they are classified to find out what makes the Rh-null type important to science and dangerous for those who live with it.

Abid Katib/Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • Fewer than 50 people worldwide have 'golden blood' — or Rh-null.
  • Blood is considered Rh-null if it lacks all of the 61 possible antigens in the Rh system.
  • It's also very dangerous to live with this blood type, as so few people have it.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists create a "lifelike" material that has metabolism and can self-reproduce

An innovation may lead to lifelike evolving machines.

Shogo Hamada/Cornell University
Surprising Science
  • Scientists at Cornell University devise a material with 3 key traits of life.
  • The goal for the researchers is not to create life but lifelike machines.
  • The researchers were able to program metabolism into the material's DNA.
Keep reading Show less