The Patients Per Doctor Map of the World

Remarkably, Cuba leads the world (or at least those countries shown on this map) in the patients per doctor ratio.

The Patients Per Doctor Map of the World

This map comes from Dutch advertising agency EuroRSCG. Using data culled from Doctors of the World, they mapped out the number of doctors per patient in every country of the world. On their site, they explain:


“This poster (published in September 2007) hangs on the wall of waiting rooms at the doctor. This way we let Dutch people know how privileged they are when it comes to medical care, and thus how appropriate it would be for them to help Doctors of the World help the less privileged.”

Remarkably, Cuba leads the world (or at least those countries shown on this map) in the patients per doctor ratio. Other countries doing very well include the successor states to the communist bloc nations, which generally had good (and cheap) health care, and the developed (capitalist) nations in Europe and beyond – although the Netherlands is quite far down, and behind neighbouring countries such as Denmark, Belgium, France and Germany, if ever so slightly.

Here’s the complete list (bigger map below):

  • Cuba 170
  • Belarus 220
  • Belgium 220
  • Greece 230
  • Russia 230
  • Georgia 240
  • Italy 240
  • Turkmenistan 240
  • Ukraine 240
  • Lithuania 250
  • Uruguay 270
  • Bulgaria 280
  • Iceland 280
  • Kazakhstan 280
  • Switzerland 280
  • Portugal 290
  • France 300
  • Germany 300
  • Hungary 300
  • South Korea 300
  • Spain 300
  • Denmark 310
  • Sweden 310
  • Finland 320
  • Netherlands 320
  • Norway 320
  • Argentina 330
  • Latvia 330
  • Ireland 360
  • Uzbekistan 360
  • Mongolia 380
  • United States 390
  • Australia 400
  • Kirgizstan 400
  • Poland 400
  • New Zealand 420
  • Great Britain 440
  • Qatar 450
  • Canada 470
  • Jordan 490
  • Tajikistan 490
  • Japan 500
  • Mexico 500
  • Venezuela 500
  • Romania 550
  • Ecuador 650
  • North Korea 650
  • Panama 700
  • Syria 700
  • Bosnia-H. 750
  • Colombia 750
  • Lybia 750
  • Oman 750
  • Saudi Arabia 750
  • Tunisia 750
  • Turkey 750
  • Bolivia 800
  • Peru 850
  • Algeria 900
  • Bahrain 900
  • Brazil 900
  • Chile 900
  • Paraguay 900
  • China 950
  • Guatemala 1.100
  • Jamaica 1.200
  • South Africa 1.300
  • Malaysia 1.400
  • Pakistan 1.400
  • Iraq 1.500
  • India 1.700
  • Laos 1.700
  • Honduras 1.800
  • Philippines 1.800
  • Sri Lanka 1.800
  • Egypt 1.900
  • Vietnam 1.900
  • Morocco 2.000
  • Iran 2.200
  • Suriname 2.200
  • Botswana 2.500
  • Nicaragua 2.700
  • Thailand 2.700
  • Myanmar 2.800
  • Yemen 3.000
  • Namibia 3.300
  • Madagascar 3.400
  • Bangladesh 3.800
  • Haiti 4.000
  • Sudan 4.500
  • Nepal 4.800
  • Afghanistan 5.300
  • Cameroon 5.300
  • Cambodia 6.300
  • Zimbabwe 6.300
  • Kenia 7.100
  • Indonesia 7.700
  • Zambia 8.300
  • D.R. Congo 9.100
  • Gambia 9.100
  • Mauritani 9.100
  • Angola 12.500
  • C.A.R. 12.500
  • Mali 12.500
  • Uganda 12.500
  • Senegal 16.500
  • Bhutan 20.000
  • Eritrea 20.000
  • Lesotho 20.000
  • Papua NG 20.000
  • Rwanda 20.000
  • Benin 25.000
  • Chad 25.000
  • Niger 25.000
  • Somalia 25.000
  • Burundi 33.500
  • Ethiopia 33.500
  • Liberia 33.500
  • Mozambique 33.500
  • Malawi 50.000
  • Tanzania 50.000
  • This map was found here at adsoftheworld.com

    This post is 185 in the Strange Maps series.

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