Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

The signs of unhealthy power dynamics in a relationship—and how to even them out

Is there a power imbalance in your relationship? You can find out by answering 28 simple questions.

A power imbalance in your relationship can cause serious damage.

Photo by fizkes on Shutterstock
  • The balance of power in relationships is an ever-changing status that deserves to be carefully monitored and cared for.
  • Negative balances of power can be defined by three different relationship dynamics: demand/withdrawal, distancer/pursuer and the fear/shame dynamic.
  • Researchers have conducted several studies and come up with a list of questions that can help you determine if your relationship has a negative power imbalance.


What is a “power imbalance” in a relationship?

Thinking about where "power" comes from - it's not just from one person. Power can be defined as the ability or capacity to direct or influence the behavior of others in a particular way. Power is not limited to domination and submission. Instead, power in relationships is understood to be the respective abilities of each person in the relationship to influence each other and direct the relationship - and this is a very complex element of romantic partnerships.

Possession of power changes the human psyche, usually in ways that we aren't aware of - one of which is the activation of the behavioral approach system that's based in our left frontal cortex.

This system is fueled by the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is considered a "feel-good" chemical. Being in control or having power feels good - this surge of dopamine that comes from feeling empowered or powerful is automatic, it's not something we can control.

According to Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner, having power makes people more likely to act like sociopaths, putting the human drive for rewards above the intimacy and connection we have with our partners. This is why the power imbalances of relationships are ever-changing.

How a negative struggle for power could be damaging your relationship (and your mental health)

man and woman pull frayed rope power struggle in relationships

Couples who are stuck in power-hungry relationship dynamics are more likely to get divorced, research says.

Photo by New Africa on Shutterstock

There are three types of relationship dynamics that can result from negative power imbalances within the relationship: demand/withdrawal, distancer/pursuer, and fear/shame.

The demand-withdrawal dynamic occurs when one partner is the "demander" who seeks change, discussion, and is in constant search of a resolution to issues within the relationship - while the other partner is withdrawn, seeking to avoid the issues.

According to a study conducted by Lauren Papp (Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin), Chrystyna Kouros and E. Mark Cummings (both with the Department of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame), the demand/withdrawal dynamic has been linked with spousal depression and is a powerful predictor of dissatisfaction in the marriage and divorce.

Their findings also established a pattern of gender-bias within relationships that had the demand/withdrawal dynamic, with women predominantly being the "demanders" and men predominantly being "withdrawn".

The distancer-pursuer dynamic is explained as such: one person (known as the pursuer) tries to achieve and maintain a certain degree of intimacy with their partner (the distancer), who considers this affection to be "smothering".

In this unhealthy dynamic, the closer the pursuer wants to be, the more resistant, defiant and withdrawn the distancer can be. This is considered to be very similar to the "demand/withdrawal" dynamic, however, with distancer/pursuer relationships the struggle is over a deeper connection and less about who has more power.

The distancer would imagine the issue in the relationship to be the "neediness" of their partner, and the pursuer would feel their partner has been cold and potentially even purposefully destructive by withholding affection.

The fear-shame dynamic is often an "unconscious" culprit of relationship troubles, as the fear and insecurity of one partner would bring out the shame and avoidance in the other - and vice versa.

According to Dr. Steven Stosny, the vulnerability of fear and shame is influenced by many different variables (such as hormone levels and traumatic experiences), which can make this dynamic particularly difficult to get out of.

Two separate researchers of negative power imbalances in relationships, Dr. John Gottman and E. Mavis Hetherington, have both concluded that couples who are seemingly stuck in one of these three negative power dynamics were at a very high risk for divorce.

Is there such a thing as a positive power struggle? 

While the idea of a power struggle or imbalance indicates something negative, not all power struggles are destructive. While the beginning stages of love might have you feeling as though you've found your "other half", relationships consist of two unique people who have different opinions, beliefs and viewpoints.

Naturally, there will be times that there is an imbalance in your relationship, however - there are some types of power struggles that allow growth within the relationship and encourage a deeper understanding and respect for each other.

According to psychiatrist Kurt Smith, a positive power struggle is one that ultimately results in the growth of the relationship. While the struggle is still a struggle, by the end of it, you will have reached an understanding of which lines can be crossed, which cannot and how much each partner is able to compromise.

This set of questions will help you determine if there is a negative power imbalance in your relationship.

close up of man and woman holding hands happy couple

There is a list of questions put forth by researchers that will help you determine if your relationship has a negative power imbalance...

Photo by Red Confidential on Shutterstock

Psychology researchers Allison Farrell, Jeffry Simpson, and Alexander Rothman conducted three separate studies* on the balance of power in relationships and from the results, were able to come up with a self-report style "test" (called the Relationship Power Inventory) for romantic partners to be able to assess the balance of power between them.

The questions provided in this inventory target important aspects of power within romantic relationships and can help you and your partner assess if you have a negative or positive imbalance of power.

  1. I have more say than my partner does when we make decisions in our relationship.
  2. I have more control over decision making than my partner does in our relationship.
  3. When we make decisions in our relationship, I get the final say.
  4. I have more influence than my partner does on decisions in our relationship.
  5. I have more power than my partner when deciding about issues in our relationship.
  6. I am more likely than my partner to get my way when we disagree about issues in our relationship.
  7. My partner typically accepts what I want when we make decisions in this domain.
  8. My partner tends to give in to my preferences when we disagree about decisions in this domain.
  9. My partner has more say than I do when we make decisions in our relationship.
  10. My partner has more control over decision making than I do in our relationship.
  11. When we make decisions in our relationship, my partner gets the final say.
  12. My partner has more influence than I do on decisions in our relationship.
  13. My partner has more power than me when deciding about issues in our relationship.
  14. My partner is more likely to get his/her way than me when we disagree about issues in our relationship.
  15. I typically accept what my partner wants when we make decisions in this domain.
  16. I tend to give in to my partner's preferences when we disagree about decisions in this domain.
  17. I am more likely than my partner to start discussions about issues in our relationship.
  18. When my partner and I make decisions in our relationship, I tend to structure and lead the discussion.
  19. I lay out the options more than my partner does when we discuss decisions in our relationship.
  20. I tend to bring up issues in our relationship more often than my partner does.
  21. I generally steer the discussions my partner and I have about decisions in this domain.
  22. I can make my partner come around to what I want when making decisions in this domain without him/her noticing what I am doing.
  23. My partner is more likely than me to start discussions about issues in our relationship.
  24. When my partner and I make decisions in our relationship, my partner tends to structure and lead the discussion.
  25. My partner lays out the options more than I do when we discuss decisions in this domain.
  26. My partner tends to bring up issues in this domain more often than I do.
  27. My partner generally steers the discussions we have about decisions in this domain.
  28. After the fact, I sometimes realize my partner influenced me without my noticing when making decisions in this domain.

You can find more on the Relationship Power Inventory here [PDF download].

*A note on the parameters of these studies: the studies mentioned above were limited to couples who were involved in monogamous heterosexual relationships, as much of the past research about power dynamics in romantic couples also focused on heterosexual relationships.

Shared power and continuously balancing the scales…

The balance of power within your relationship is a fascinating and extremely important thing to be aware of, as it can play a key role in the positive (or negative) direction of your romantic life together.

Reaching a balance in power can be explained as "shared power", where both partners take responsibility for themselves and the health of the relationship. In this ideal balance of power, ideas and decisions are shared jointly and points of view are respected and valued. There is an open line of communication and where issues arise, there is space for vulnerability and compassion.

The key elements that produce a healthy balance of power in a relationship are:

  • Attention: when both partners feel their emotional needs are being met
  • Influence: when both partners have the ability to engage with and emotionally affect the other.
  • Accommodation: while there may be times where one partner's need must be put above the others (in a time of tragedy, for example), most decisions are made jointly.
  • Respect: when each partner has positive regard, respect, and admiration for the humanity of the other person.
  • Selfhood: when each partner maintains a positive value of self and is able to be their own person both within and outside of the relationship.
  • Vulnerability: each partner is willing to admit fault, weakness or uncertainties in themselves.
  • Fairness: when both partners feel that the responsibilities and duties in their lives are divided in a way that supports each person.

According to Theresa e DiDonato, a social psychiatrist and associate professor at Loyola University in Maryland, one of the keys to a successful long-term relationship is a consistent reassessment of the balance of power - because in healthy relationships, the power structure will inevitably shift and change as both people involved change and as you tackle new life challenges together.

"There a widely held belief that to be loved you have to abandon power and vice versa - and then you choose a partner who is able to provide the missing function."

- Adam Kahane, Power and Love

Neom, Saudi Arabia's $500 billion megacity, reaches its next phase

Construction of the $500 billion dollar tech city-state of the future is moving ahead.

Credit: Neom
Technology & Innovation
  • The futuristic megacity Neom is being built in Saudi Arabia.
  • The city will be fully automated, leading in health, education and quality of life.
  • It will feature an artificial moon, cloud seeding, robotic gladiators and flying taxis.
Keep reading Show less

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories?

Are we genetically inclined for superstition or just fearful of the truth?

Videos
  • From secret societies to faked moon landings, one thing that humanity seems to have an endless supply of is conspiracy theories. In this compilation, physicist Michio Kaku, science communicator Bill Nye, psychologist Sarah Rose Cavanagh, skeptic Michael Shermer, and actor and playwright John Cameron Mitchell consider the nature of truth and why some groups believe the things they do.
  • "I think there's a gene for superstition, a gene for hearsay, a gene for magic, a gene for magical thinking," argues Kaku. The theoretical physicist says that science goes against "natural thinking," and that the superstition gene persists because, one out of ten times, it actually worked and saved us.
  • Other theories shared include the idea of cognitive dissonance, the dangerous power of fear to inhibit critical thinking, and Hollywood's romanticization of conspiracies. Because conspiracy theories are so diverse and multifaceted, combating them has not been an easy task for science.

COVID-19 brain study to explore long-term effects of the virus

A growing body of research suggests COVID-19 can cause serious neurological problems.

Brain images of a patient with acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis.

Coronavirus
  • The new study seeks to track the health of 50,000 people who have tested positive for COVID-19.
  • The study aims to explore whether the disease causes cognitive impairment and other conditions.
  • Recent research suggests that COVID-19 can, directly or indirectly, cause brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage and other neurological problems.
Keep reading Show less
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation

Better reskilling can future-proof jobs in the age of automation. Enter SkillUp's new coalition.

Coronavirus layoffs are a glimpse into our automated future. We need to build better education opportunities now so Americans can find work in the economy of tomorrow.

Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast