What your sleeping position says about you

A new study correlates personality type with sleeping position, with infographics

If you’re 29 and you sleep eight hours a night, you’ve snoozed away 11 years of your life so far — we’re talking 592 weeks and nearly 100,000 hours, according to the My Life Asleep calculator. That’s a big chunk of your life. You know how you act when you’re awake, but what about that other third of your day?


Best Mattress Brand, being in the sleep business, wanted to know if there was a connection between who we are and how we sleep, so they surveyed 1,011 people to find out. Each respondent took an abbreviated Myers-Briggs personality test of 10 questions that identified the introverts and extroverts and another 20 questions that sorted the feelers from the thinkers. They were then asked about their preferred sleeping positions.

It just published the results, and there are some intriguing correlations.

Fetal Attraction

Surprisingly, more people sleep in the fetal position than any other. That pose is followed closely by people sleeping on their stomachs, feet out, hugging a pillow.

Position Personalities

Apparently, some 64% of introverts and 31% of feelers prefer the fetal position — no surprise there. The top five sleeping positions broke down as follows into the four personality types.

Feelers and Thinkers Asleep

Here are the favorite sleeping positions for feelers and thinkers sleeping alone.

When these people pair off, they do so like this.

Introverts and Extroverts Asleep

When introverts and extroverts don’t share a bed, these are the positions they gravitate to.

In introvert/extrovert couples, the night passes thusly.

About Tonight

Fascinating as this is, let’s hope it doesn’t generate an impulse toward aspirational sleeping. You know, losing sleep by forcing yourself to assume the pose of a personality type you’d like to be.

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