Extroverts May Be More Exhausted Than Introverts 3 Hours Later

New study says extroverts are more fatigued over time from social interaction than introverts.

extrovert
(STUDIO GRAND QUEST via SHUTTERSTOCK)


A fair amount of research has been done involving what psychologists call the Big Five personality traits: openness to experience, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. It’s been found the extroversion is a trait that has an immediate positive outcome. Unlike introverts, extroverts get happy when they’re socializing, though even the former can get there, too, just by pretending to be extroverted. New research suggests, though, that extroverts may pay a price for their fun, a price that introverts don’t pay.

The study’s authors studied 48 Finnish university students — 41 were women, 7 were men. They found that, though enjoyable in the short term, interacting with others took something out of them because after several hours, they showed evidence of fatigue. For any extroverts, this is good news: It means that post-hang sleepiness is normal.

(SUSAN HUNT)

Oddly, this wasn’t true of introverts in the study. It’s long been assumed that dealing with other people is draining for introverts, but this research finds this not to be so. Maybe they just find socializing less natural and enjoyable. We can guess that introverted subjects are less depleted by socializing simply because they invest less energy in it, but the study doesn’t conclude that, being more about correlation than causality.

The research was undertaken as an attempt to confirm or refute the idea increasingly reported in popular media that being extroverted is draining and potentially damaging over the long term. Author Susan Cain’s book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking has been a healthy seller, and just last week, surprising new research found a link between (presumably extroverted) teens with large social networks and later issues with mental health.

(TIM SIMPSON)

One of the authors of the current study, Sointu Leikas of the University of Helsinki, was interested in learning the longer-term effects of this kind of behavior since studies in the past have tended to view them outside of their full-day context, focusing only on short-term effects. Leikas tells PsyPost, “First, we do not yet know very much about the everyday life behavioral processes — for instance, how our current behavior relates to what we do next, what kind of behavior predicts fatigue, stress, or positive mood etc. However, such processes are interesting both from the scientific perspective and from the perspective of everyday life.”

Leilas cautioned about over-certainty regarding the study’s findings since it involved such a small sample: “It is very important to replicate the results in a new, larger sample with more men, before we can confidently claim that extroverted behavior really is related to later fatigue... It is possible that Introverts actually become more tired — however, if they do, the difference is likely to be very small.”

COVID-19 amplified America’s devastating health gap. Can we bridge it?

The COVID-19 pandemic is making health disparities in the United States crystal clear. It is a clarion call for health care systems to double their efforts in vulnerable communities.

Willie Mae Daniels makes melted cheese sandwiches with her granddaughter, Karyah Davis, 6, after being laid off from her job as a food service cashier at the University of Miami on March 17, 2020.

Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated America's health disparities, widening the divide between the haves and have nots.
  • Studies show disparities in wealth, race, and online access have disproportionately harmed underserved U.S. communities during the pandemic.
  • To begin curing this social aliment, health systems like Northwell Health are establishing relationships of trust in these communities so that the post-COVID world looks different than the pre-COVID one.
Keep reading Show less

Mathematical model shows how the Nazis could have won WWII's Battle of Britain

With just a few strategical tweaks, the Nazis could have won one of World War II's most decisive battles.

Photo: Heinrich Hoffmann/ullstein bild via Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The Battle of Britain is widely recognized as one of the most significant battles that occurred during World War II. It marked the first major victory of the Allied forces and shifted the tide of the war.
  • Historians, however, have long debated the deciding factor in the British victory and German defeat.
  • A new mathematical model took into account numerous alternative tactics that the German's could have made and found that just two tweaks stood between them and victory over Britain.
Keep reading Show less

The neoliberal era is ending. What comes next?

The next era in American history can look entirely different. It's up to us to choose.

Videos
  • The timeline of America post-WWII can be divided into two eras, according to author and law professor Ganesh Sitaraman: the liberal era which ran through the 1970s, and the current neoliberal era which began in the early 1980s. The latter promised a "more free society," but what we got instead was more inequality, less opportunity, and greater market consolidation.
  • "We've lived through a neoliberal era for the last 40 years, and that era is coming to an end," Sitaraman says, adding that the ideas and policies that defined the period are being challenged on various levels.
  • What comes next depends on if we take a proactive and democratic approach to shaping the economy, or if we simply react to and "deal with" market outcomes.

Keep reading Show less

10 ways to prepare for rise of intelligent machines – MIT study

A new MIT report proposes how humans should prepare for the age of automation and artificial intelligence.

An employee cleans around early test robot displays at the Akin Robotics factory on March 15, 2018 in Konya, Turkey.

Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • A new report by MIT experts proposes what humans should do to prepare for the age of automation.
  • The rise of intelligent machines is coming but it's important to resolve human issues first.
  • Improving economic inequality, skills training, and investment in innovation are necessary steps.
Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast