You've got 10 minutes with Einstein. What do you talk about? Black holes? Time travel?

Why not gambling? The Art of War? Contemporary parenting?

Each week, host Jason Gots surprises some of the world's brightest minds with ideas they're not at all prepared to discuss. Join us and special guests Neil Gaiman, Alan Alda, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Atwood, Richard Dawkins, Maria Popova, Mary-Louise Parker, Neil deGrasse Tyson and many more...

Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Really actually truly great English (with the copy chief of Random House)

Why does Faulkner use "inchoate" so much? Maybe because Benjamin Dreyer wasn't his copy editor. The author of DREYER'S ENGLISH is here to remind us that there's no absolute authority on the English language. Still, please avoid "onboarding".

Think Again Podcasts
  • Hear! As we play "stump the host" with words everyone spells wrong.
  • Marvel! With us at the exquisiteness of the word "twee"
  • Absorb! Benjamin Dreyer's simple yet powerful advice about how to write better sentences.


There are two kinds of people in this world: Those who don't give a damn about grammar, style, or syntax, and those who write aggrieved letters to publishing houses about split infinitives.

Benjamin Dreyer is neither. As the Copy Chief of Random House, it is his unenviable task to steer the middle way between linguistic pedantry and letting these writers get away with bloody murder. Scratch "bloody"—redundancy.

Before reading his hilarious and practical new book DREYER'S ENGLISH, I think I would have imagined the Copy Chief of Random House as something like the Arbiter Eligantiae of Ancient Rome—a terrifying, absolute authority on questions of grammatical law and taste. The kind of person who walks around waving a scepter at things to be preserved or destroyed. As the book makes plain, however, there's no absolute authority when it comes to either taste or correctness in the English language. Still, please avoid "impactful", "utilize", and 'very unique." And use the Oxford comma. And you can do away with just, really, and actually while you're at it.

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