You've got 10 minutes with Einstein. What do you talk about? Black holes? Time travel?

Why not gambling? The Art of War? Contemporary parenting?

Each week, host Jason Gots surprises some of the world's brightest minds with ideas they're not at all prepared to discuss. Join us and special guests Neil Gaiman, Alan Alda, Salman Rushdie, Margaret Atwood, Richard Dawkins, Maria Popova, Mary-Louise Parker, Neil deGrasse Tyson and many more...

It’s the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine

Killer robots. Alien invasions. Climate change. Josh Clark of Stuff You Should Know and the new podcast The End of the World thinks a lot these days about existential threats. Believe it or not, he's optimistic.

Think Again Podcasts
  • Could the threat of extinction be humanity's opportunity to get our collective s#*t together?
  • Two centuries since the Enlightenment, the war between reason and belief is still raging. Why?
  • Why is it still hard to explain to some people what a podcast is?



I like to think. If I didn't, this would be the wrong job for me. But I realize that as open-minded as I like to consider myself, I've taken a thick, black sharpie to certain areas of the philosophical map, scrawling "here there be monsters" and leaving them be. We're all like this to some extent—it's the flip side of interest—even if you're super-curious, the things that interest you most become safe spaces. Comfort zones. And there's nothing wrong with that.

But if you want to keep learning, it's necessary to spend time in regions of reality that scare the crap out of you. The things you don't want to look at. And if, like me, your unsafe spaces include the many catastrophes that could befall the human race—you couldn't ask for a more affable, well-informed, tour guide than Josh Clark. Trained in history and anthropology, Josh is a writer and podcaster—host of Stuff You Should Know and now, The End of the World—a 10 part series that looks at the many ways humanity might go extinct. And what we can do about them. And why it's all worth taking very, very seriously.

Surprise conversation starters in this episode:

Michelle Thaller on how astronauts poop in space

Shane Parrish on emotions and decision making

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