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5 ways to cope during a crisis when you can’t quit your job

A bit of planning goes a long way.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

When Carole King's border collie went missing in July, she decided to quit her job and devote her time to finding her furry companion, People reported.


After a 57-day search, the Washington State woman was reunited with her dog.

We love this heartwarming story of love and perseverance. But how can you get through a personal crisis — and losing a beloved pet definitely counts as one — when taking time off from work or putting your career on hold isn't an option? Here, experts offer their tips for coping at work when you're going through a hardship.

Set realistic goals

Sometimes it's inevitable that what we go through outside of work affects our output or energy on the job. "You can't expect yourself to be performing at the same level as when you were at 100%," says Annie Varvaryan, Psy.D, a clinical psychologist. But the key is to be clear with your boss if your work — or your team's work — is going to be affected. "Don't hide it," says Kerri Twigg, a career coach and job search strategist. "See if you can bring in some extra support on some projects."

Surround yourself with support

Some people's tendency during a tough time is to isolate, notes Varvaryan. But it's important to "allow yourself to connect to people you trust or are close to," she says. Sometimes what we need most is someone to help validate our feelings, but it's OK if you don't feel comfortable sharing details with people you work with. If you're tight-lipped all day, try to connect with friends or loved ones when work is done, says Elizabeth Cohen, Ph.D., a New York City-based clinical psychologist.

Prioritize self-care

In the midst of a tough time, self-care can feel like a lofty, unrealistic goal. But experts agree that even the simplest acts can impact your well-being during a hardship. Twigg encourages packing "lunches that are healthy and nourishing" as a start.

Communicate

If you worked out a flexible schedule, such as coming in later than usual or leaving early to tend to what's going on in your personal life, be sure your manager knows how to reach you when you're not in the office. It's also important to let people know when you'll be offline and won't be checking email or texts. While it can be uncomfortable to have these talks upfront, being direct is often the best way to avoid added stress.

Take breaks

It may not be realistic to take a sabbatical from work, but that doesn't mean you can't take mini-breaks to restore and replenish you throughout the day. Twigg advises "blocking out 10 or 15 minutes in [a private] room to meditate or just sit in silence."

Reprinted with permission of Thrive Global. Read the original article.

Is the universe a graveyard? This theory suggests humanity may be alone.

Ever since we've had the technology, we've looked to the stars in search of alien life. It's assumed that we're looking because we want to find other life in the universe, but what if we're looking to make sure there isn't any?

According to the Great Filter theory, Earth might be one of the only planets with intelligent life. And that's a good thing (NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team [STScI/AURA]).
Surprising Science

Here's an equation, and a rather distressing one at that: N = R* × fP × ne × f1 × fi × fc × L. It's the Drake equation, and it describes the number of alien civilizations in our galaxy with whom we might be able to communicate. Its terms correspond to values such as the fraction of stars with planets, the fraction of planets on which life could emerge, the fraction of planets that can support intelligent life, and so on. Using conservative estimates, the minimum result of this equation is 20. There ought to be 20 intelligent alien civilizations in the Milky Way that we can contact and who can contact us. But there aren't any.

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The key to better quality education? Make students feel valued.

Building a personal connection with students can counteract some negative side effects of remote learning.

Future of Learning
  • Not being able to engage with students in-person due to the pandemic has presented several new challenges for educators, both technical and social. Digital tools have changed the way we all think about learning, but George Couros argues that more needs to be done to make up for what has been lost during "emergency remote teaching."
  • One interesting way he has seen to bridge that gap and strengthen teacher-student and student-student relationships is through an event called Identity Day. Giving students the opportunity to share something they are passionate about makes them feel more connected and gets them involved in their education.
  • "My hope is that we take these skills and these abilities we're developing through this process and we actually become so much better for our kids when we get back to our face-to-face setting," Couros says. He adds that while no one can predict the future, we can all do our part to adapt to it.
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Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

Frequent shopping for single items adds to our carbon footprint.

A truck pulls out of a large Walmart regional distribution center on June 6, 2019 in Washington, Utah.

Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores.
  • Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.
  • Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference.
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Personal Growth

Childhood sleeping problems may signal mental disorders later in life

Chronic irregular sleep in children was associated with psychotic experiences in adolescence, according to a recent study out of the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology.

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