5 short podcasts to boost your creativity and success

These quick bursts of inspiration will brighten your day in 10 minutes or less.

Podcasts can educate us on a variety of topics, but they don't have to last an hour or more to have an impact on the way you perceive the world. Here are five podcasts that will boost your creativity and well-being in 10 minutes or less.


The Slowdown with Tracy K. Smith

Smith, a U.S. Poet Laureate, narrates this podcast, which features poetry readings. The episodes are mostly just five minutes each. With more than 60 to choose from, there are a variety of poems to explore, from "Dancing in Buses" to "To My Twenty-Four-Year-Old Self." The podcast is a collaboration between the Library of Congress, the Poetry Foundation, and American Public Media.

60-Second Science

Scientific American's podcast features insight from science journalists on a variety of concepts, such as "Our Brains Really Remember Some Pop Music" and "Rocking Helps Adults Sleep Too." The mini-episodes are up to three minutes long. If you're interested in learning brief, useful insights and anecdotes that you can discuss with coworkers or at dinner parties, this is your best bet.

Kind World

This podcast by WBUR showcases heartfelt moments that prove a little kindness can go a long way. Its mission is to "explore the effect one act can have on a life, to better understand each other and ourselves," and episodes like "My Dad's Friendship With Charles Barkley" and "When the Sun Came Out" may just restore your faith in the power of human connections. Most of the stories featured on the podcast are less than 10 minutes long.

Brain Training Podcast

A "daily audio workout for your head," these five-minutes-max episodes — like "Order and Backwards" and "Words and Order" — are designed to put your brain to the test. Each episode features two games, with three rounds each.

The 10-Minute Entrepreneur

Hosted by author, teacher, and speaker Sean Castrina, this quick podcast teachesentrepreneurs how to reach their goals. Most of the episodes are around 10 minutes long, and they span a variety of smart, useful topics, like "Learning from Failure."

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Reprinted with permission of Thrive Global. Read the original article.

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