The rise of Mark Zuckerberg explained in one amazing infographic

This detailed infographic shows the path of Mark Zuckerberg's life.


At the ripe old age of 33, Mark Zuckerberg is already a legendary international figure. He has been running a truly transformative tech company that had a million users when he was just 20. The movie about his life has already been made and, of course, won three Oscars.

Once a business wunderkind and poster boy for the tech revolution, Zuckerberg has now become a polarizing figure as the fears about Facebook's disregard for privacy concerns have turned out to be well-founded.

Zuckerberg's recent testimonies before the U.S. Congress mark just how far the technology sector has come. It has an increasing influence on our lives, able to know everything about us, microtargeting and micromanaging our lives with increasing precision. The testimony of Facebook's CEO also highlighted the deep knowledge gap between the elderly Congress and the new generation of the country's leaders. They might as well be living in different universes.


Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies on Capitol Hill, April 11, 2018. (Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images/ BigThink)

How did Mark Zuckerberg become such a force in the modern world? Born on May 14th, 1984 in White Plains, New York, he was raised by a dentist and a psychiatrist. He got interested in computers at an early age, creating a messaging program called Zucknet when he was 12. His dad used it in his office to get messages about new patients.

Zuckerberg continued to be a computer prodigy, programming games and a Pandora-like music software called Synapse.

He went to Harvard University in 2002 but dropped out while a sophomore to pursue a little networking site called "The Facebook."

Zuckerberg brought up his dorm room at Harvard a number of times during his congressional testimony, highlighting how far he has come, admitting that he made some mistakes along the way:

"We have made a lot of mistakes in running the company,” he said. “I think it’s — it’s pretty much impossible, I — I believe, to start a company in your dorm room and then grow it to be at the scale that we’re at now without making some mistakes.”

With an estimated net worth of $64.1 billion, Zuckerberg is one of the richest people in the world. Here's more on his path to the status and influence he has today in this fascinating infographic created by Anna Vital on Adioma.



Stress is contagious–but resilience can be too

The way that you think about stress can actually transform the effect that it has on you – and others.

Big Think Edge
  • Stress is contagious, and the higher up in an organization you are the more your stress will be noticed and felt by others.
  • Kelly McGonigal teaches "Reset your mindset to reduce stress" for Big Think Edge.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.
Keep reading Show less

Think of the closest planet to Earth... Wrong! Think again!

Three scientists publish a paper proving that Mercury, not Venus, is the closest planet to Earth.

Strange Maps
  • Earth is the third planet from the Sun, so our closest neighbor must be planet two or four, right?
  • Wrong! Neither Venus nor Mars is the right answer.
  • Three scientists ran the numbers. In this YouTube video, one of them explains why our nearest neighbor is... Mercury!
Keep reading Show less

Horseshoe crabs are captured for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

The blood of horseshoe crabs is harvested on a massive scale in order to retrieve a cell critical to medical research. However, recent innovations might make this practice obsolete.

An Atlantic horseshoe crab in an aquarium. Photo: Domdomegg via Wikimedia Commons.
Surprising Science
  • Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.
  • This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.
  • Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood.
Keep reading Show less

10 novels that brilliantly capture the American experience

The distance between the American dream and reality is expressed best through literature.

American novelist, writer, playwright, poet, essayist and civil rights activist James Baldwin poses at his home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, southern France, on November 6, 1979. (Photo: Ralph Gatti/AFP/Getty Images)
Culture & Religion
  • Literature expands our ability to feel empathy and inspires compassion.
  • These 10 novels tackle some facet of the American experience.
  • The list includes a fictional retelling of the first Native American to graduate from Harvard, and hiding out in inner-city Newark.
Keep reading Show less