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Three great questions


I especially like the last of these three questions from Rodney Trice. We should be asking teachers and principals that question more often (and just that directly).

  • How do you intend to bring the global community into your classroom?
  • How will you prepare students for a future that is relatively unknown?
  • How you will eliminate the racial predictability of achievement outcomes in your classroom?
  • This just in: Teenagers play video games!

    All kidding aside, the latest report from the amazing Pew Internet & American Life Project confirms that kids - even girls! – are up to their eyeballs in video games.

    We’ll stick to the tried and (not) true

    Nope, sorry. iPods are not allowed. Back to the old way. Too bad it doesn’t work as well. Gotta do it anyway. Oh, and I love how the music players are categorically, by definition, a ‘distraction’ (if not in actuality). Who needs reality when we have these little educational policy fantasy worlds that we can create for ourselves?

    Throw da bums out!

    After attempts to bring in turnaround experts didn’t work, the state of Maryland is increasingly leaning toward completely restructuring schools that are academically unsuccessful. State schools Superintendent Nancy Grasmick says:

    We are very comfortable being more aggressive about this. We have seen much better results [when the staff is replaced].

    Blog like a farmer

    I ran across an old post by Mike Sansone, one of my Iowa blogging buddies. I really like his metaphor that blogging should be like farming.

    Scorecards

    I bet parents and community members would really like to see scorecards like this one (maybe with different data) for their local schools. I know some schools and districts already do this. Hopefully they use line graphs rather than tables of numbers. Could you tell the essential story of a school district with 10 key, well-done graphs? I bet you could!

    No writing in journalism class?

    Check out this excellent article about the NYU journalism student who got in trouble for blogging about her class. [hat tip to Tim Stahmer]

    I got no money, honey

    Did you catch Edutopia’s advice on how to innovate without extra money or support?

    Spend hours on content you can find with Google in 3 seconds!

    One of my favorite things about Wes Fryer is his ability to highlight the ridiculous. I also enjoy his irreverance (“Behold! I hold aloft the holy words!”), particularly when I have the same experience at my kids’ school.

    Speaking of Google…

    Finally, I’m digging Google Chrome. it’s now my default browser and I’m using Firefox less and less (and I love Firefox). Chrome is much faster. I also like that each tab is a separate process; I have yet to have a browser hang…

    Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

    The controversy around the Torah codes gets a new life.

    Michael Drosnin
    Surprising Science
    • Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts.
    • The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software.
    • Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written.
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    The mystery of Jesus’ brother gets even weirder

    The controversy over whether Jesus had any siblings is reignited after an amazing new discovery of an ancient text.

    Jesus and James. Unknown painter. Possibly 14th century.
    Politics & Current Affairs
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    Orangutans exhibit awareness of the past

    Orangutans join humans and bees in a very exclusive club

    (Eugene Sim/Shutterstock)
    Surprising Science
    • Orangutan mothers wait to sound a danger alarm to avoid tipping off predators to their location
    • It took a couple of researchers crawling around the Sumatran jungle to discover the phenomenon
    • This ability may come from a common ancestor
    Keep reading Show less