NECC 2008 - SIGTC Forum

I attended the SIGTC Forum, run by Ferdi Serim, on Sunday for about an hour. SIGTC is ISTE's special interest group for technology coordinators. Two things from the session that troubled me...


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1. No recognition of principals as instructional leaders

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Ferdi outlined five different roles that needed to be involved in discussions about teaching and learning:

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  • Guide (teacher leader) – knows about designing learning experiences; has daily experience with children
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  • Scholar (librarian / media specialist) – knows about research, organizing knowledge
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  • Hard Hat (technical specialist) – knows about hardware, software, and networks
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  • Pilot (principal) – knows about managing people, schedules, and budgets
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  • Wizard (technology / curriculum coordinator) – knows about managing systems and processes; at district level
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Notice the emphasis on the managerial roles of principals. Nary a mention of the instructional leadership responsibilities of building-level leaders. Very disappointing.

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2. The equity trap

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There was some discussion about digital equity. Specifically, there seemed to be a fair amount of agreement in the group that – when it comes to digital technologies or whatever – if we don't have enough for everybody, we can't do it at all because of the complaints from the folks that don't receive it.

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How are we ever going to move forward if this is the mentality of our school organizations?

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Other notes from the session

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Cisco white paper: Equipping every learner for the 21st century

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21st century pedagogy to teach 21st century skills which is enabled by technology and supported by adapted system reform

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The goal is to move from automation to facilitation to transformation

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Desired educational technology outcomes will occur only if they are supported by the entire system

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Gartner's hype cycle

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  1. Technology trigger
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  3. Peak of inflated expectations
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  5. Trough of disillusionment
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  7. Slope of enlightment
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  9. Plateau of productivity
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Sources of information on emerging technologies

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