Struggling Korean Baseball Team Fills Seats with Robot Fans

The Hanwa Eagles have introduced a cheering section of automated fans that can be controlled by fans at home. The struggling team hopes these new supporters will improve the game-day atmosphere.

Struggling Korean Baseball Team Fills Seats with Robot Fans

What's the Latest?


Your favorite sports team's cheering section has probably been called some choice words in the past. Has "robots" ever been one of them?

The Hanwa Eagles, a Korean baseball club, has installed a cheering section comprised of robot supporters. Marketed as a way for fans to back their team even if they can't make it to the stadium, each robot acts as a surrogate that relays messages from folks sitting at home.

What's the Big Idea?

The Hanwha Eagles Fanbots, in an effort to be just that much more creepy, feature screens over their faces so fans at home can upload their photos. The robot rooting section participates in stadium-wide group cheers and can even do the wave, albeit a molasses slow wave as each robot is about as lithe as a geriatric.

The Eagles are perennial cellar dwellers in the Korean Baseball Organization standings -- at the time of this writing they were 9th out of 9, sporting a dismal .375 winning percentage. Despite the team's struggles on the field, the Eagles' brass hopes their robot fans will help electrify the game-day atmosphere.

Keep reading at BBC News

Photo credit : Kyrien / Shutterstock

Weird science shows unseemly way beetles escape after being eaten

Certain water beetles can escape from frogs after being consumed.

R. attenuata escaping from a black-spotted pond frog.

Surprising Science
  • A Japanese scientist shows that some beetles can wiggle out of frog's butts after being eaten whole.
  • The research suggests the beetle can get out in as little as 7 minutes.
  • Most of the beetles swallowed in the experiment survived with no complications after being excreted.
Keep reading Show less

The cost of world peace? It's much less than the price of war

The world's 10 most affected countries are spending up to 59% of their GDP on the effects of violence.

Mario Tama/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Conflict and violence cost the world more than $14 trillion a year.
  • That's the equivalent of $5 a day for every person on the planet.
  • Research shows that peace brings prosperity, lower inflation and more jobs.
  • Just a 2% reduction in conflict would free up as much money as the global aid budget.
  • Report urges governments to improve peacefulness, especially amid COVID-19.
Keep reading Show less

The evolution of modern rainforests began with the dinosaur-killing asteroid

The lush biodiversity of South America's rainforests is rooted in one of the most cataclysmic events that ever struck Earth.

Velociraptor Dinosaur in the Rainforest

meen_na via Adobe Stock
Surprising Science
  • One especially mysterious thing about the asteroid impact, which killed the dinosaurs, is how it transformed Earth's tropical rainforests.
  • A recent study analyzed ancient fossils collected in modern-day Colombia to determine how tropical rainforests changed after the bolide impact.
  • The results highlight how nature is able to recover from cataclysmic events, though it may take millions of years.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast