Struggling Korean Baseball Team Fills Seats with Robot Fans

The Hanwa Eagles have introduced a cheering section of automated fans that can be controlled by fans at home. The struggling team hopes these new supporters will improve the game-day atmosphere.

What's the Latest?


Your favorite sports team's cheering section has probably been called some choice words in the past. Has "robots" ever been one of them?

The Hanwa Eagles, a Korean baseball club, has installed a cheering section comprised of robot supporters. Marketed as a way for fans to back their team even if they can't make it to the stadium, each robot acts as a surrogate that relays messages from folks sitting at home.

What's the Big Idea?

The Hanwha Eagles Fanbots, in an effort to be just that much more creepy, feature screens over their faces so fans at home can upload their photos. The robot rooting section participates in stadium-wide group cheers and can even do the wave, albeit a molasses slow wave as each robot is about as lithe as a geriatric.

The Eagles are perennial cellar dwellers in the Korean Baseball Organization standings -- at the time of this writing they were 9th out of 9, sporting a dismal .375 winning percentage. Despite the team's struggles on the field, the Eagles' brass hopes their robot fans will help electrify the game-day atmosphere.

Keep reading at BBC News

Photo credit : Kyrien / Shutterstock

SpaceX catches Falcon Heavy nosecone with net-outfitted boat

It marks another milestone in SpaceX's long-standing effort to make spaceflight cheaper.

Technology & Innovation
  • SpaceX launched Falcon Heavy into space early Tuesday morning.
  • A part of its nosecone – known as a fairing – descended back to Earth using special parachutes.
  • A net-outfitted boat in the Atlantic Ocean successfully caught the reusable fairing, likely saving the company millions of dollars.
Keep reading Show less

Are these 100 people killing the planet?

Controversial map names CEOs of 100 companies producing 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

Image: Jordan Engel, reused via Decolonial Media License 0.1
Strange Maps
  • Just 100 companies produce 71 percent of the world's greenhouse gases.
  • This map lists their names and locations, and their CEOs.
  • The climate crisis may be too complex for these 100 people to solve, but naming and shaming them is a good start.
Keep reading Show less

‘Climate apartheid’: Report says the rich could buy out of climate change disaster

The world's richest people could breeze through a climate disaster – for a price.

(Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new report from a United Nation expert warns that an over-reliance on the private sector to mitigate climate change could cause a "climate apartheid."
  • The report criticizes several countries, including the U.S., for taking "short-sighted steps in the wrong direction."
  • The world's poorest populations are most vulnerable to climate change even though they generally contribute the least to global emissions.
Keep reading Show less