Researchers Build a Cellphone that Sees through Walls

What's the Latest Development?


By combining advances in the fields of electromagnetism and computing, researchers at UT Dallas have created a cellphone that can see through walls, aiding humans in all sorts of real-life situations. Scientists have opened up a previously unusable portion of the electromagnetic spectrum called the terahertz range while further developing an inexpensive method of making computer chips using Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology which "forms the basis of many consumer electronic devices used in daily life such as personal computers, smart phones, high definition TV and game consoles."

What's the Big Idea?

Dr. Kenneth O, leader of the new research and professor of electrical engineering at UT Dallas is optimistic about the technology: "The combination of CMOS and terahertz means you could put this chip and receiver on the back of a cellphone, turning it into a device carried in your pocket that can see through objects," he said. "Consumer applications of such technology could range from finding studs in walls to authentication of important documents. Businesses could use it to detect counterfeit money. Manufacturing companies could apply it to process control..."

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

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