Now Crowdfunding: A 'Perfect,' No-Odor Travel Shirt

Say goodbye to being the smelly dude on the plane.

How often have you had to travel with a lighter wardrobe than you'd have liked? Chances are if you've tried to stretch one shirt over multiple days on the move, it's probably ended up looking (and, no doubt, smelling) like the one in the photo above.


The folks at Libertad Apparel believe they have a solution to the stinky travel shirt conundrum, and they're in the process of crowdfunding the capital needed to proceed.

The secret is in the material. Libertad extols Merino wool as "the all-natural, high-performance fiber," which sounds kind of like a tired marketing cliché because, well, it is. But because of advancements in weaving technology, the makers of Libertad were able to take a fabric used most often in blankets and turn it into a shirt that can be worn year-round without resulting in stink. The product is wrinkle-free and stain-resistant, as well as biodegradable, renewable, eco-friendly, and all those other buzzwords that imply it didn't take the burning of a Saudi oil field to make it happen.

Libertad also stresses that its shirt is super stylish and upscale cool, which I suppose I have to take its word for because I'm currently wearing slippers and a T-shirt from high school.

Check out the Libertad Kickstarter for more information on the product. Future retail is $150, which might be more than I value not being stinky, although the early crowdfunding price is a relatively low $87. The key takeaway here is that age-old items such as the humble travel shirt are not exempt from innovation, especially in our rapid tech-advancement age. Libertad has all the bells and whistles one would hope for from a product like this, and if you're the type of person who pushes yourself to the limit when out adventuring, this idea is probably for you.

Read more at the Telegraph.

Photo credit: ollo / Getty iStock

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