New App Makes Millions of Mobile Medical Records

A California-based insurance giant has released an app that will allow its nine million clients to access their medical records on Android OS. The iOS version is coming in a few months.

What's the Latest Development?


Small new companies typically have the edge over established behemoths when it comes to innovation, but not always. The large California-based insurance provider Kaiser Permanente has released a new smartphone app that allows its nine million clients to access their medical records using Android OS (the iOS version will be released in a few months). Given that smartphone access to its website has increased by 46 percent since last year, the app validates the notion that mobile technology has become an essential part of healthcare.

What's the Big Idea?

With the new app, patients can instantly access their lab results, diagnostic information, send direct and secure email to doctors, schedule appointments, and order prescription refills. They will also have access to more than 68 million lab test results made available on the Kaiser Permanente website last year. Despite slow adoptionthe New England Journal of Medicine said in 2009 that only 1.5 percent of US hospitals have a comprehensive electronic medical systemelectronic records promise to change the way we receive health care.

Photo credit: shutterstock.com

'Upstreamism': Your zip code affects your health as much as genetics

Upstreamism advocate Rishi Manchanda calls us to understand health not as a "personal responsibility" but a "common good."

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Upstreamism tasks health care professionals to combat unhealthy social and cultural influences that exist outside — or upstream — of medical facilities.
  • Patients from low-income neighborhoods are most at risk of negative health impacts.
  • Thankfully, health care professionals are not alone. Upstreamism is increasingly part of our cultural consciousness.
Keep reading Show less

Afghanistan is the most depressed country on earth

No, depression is not just a type of 'affluenza' – poor people in conflict zones are more likely candidates

Image: Our World in Data / CC BY
Strange Maps
  • Often seen as typical of rich societies, depression is actually more prevalent in poor, conflict-ridden countries
  • More than one in five Afghans is clinically depressed – a sad world record
  • But are North Koreans really the world's 'fourth least depressed' people?
Keep reading Show less

Banned books: 10 of the most-challenged books in America

America isn't immune to attempts to remove books from libraries and schools, here are ten frequent targets and why you ought to go check them out.

Nazis burn books on a huge bonfire of 'anti-German' literature in the Opernplatz, Berlin. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
Culture & Religion
  • Even in America, books are frequently challenged and removed from schools and public libraries.
  • Every year, the American Library Association puts on Banned Books Week to draw attention to this fact.
  • Some of the books they include on their list of most frequently challenged are some of the greatest, most beloved, and entertaining books there are.
Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Oumuamua, a quarter-mile long asteroid tumbling through space, is Hawaiian for "scout", or "the first of many".
  • It was given this name because it came from another solar system.
  • Some claimed 'Oumuamua was an alien technology, but there's no actual evidence for that.