2 Weeks Maternity Leave Is Enough for Me, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer

The current length of maternity leave is one-size-fits-all, but what does that say about the value we place on balancing work and family?


Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo and one of the few women in leadership positions in the tech industry, is making waves. Not because of a particular acquisition or business decision, but because she is taking “limited” time off for the birth of her twins. The fact that this is news begs a couple of questions: Are there special considerations we should give women when they have children, and what kind of pressure are we putting on women to decide between work and family?

Women have fought for equal rights since the patriarchy party began, but not much attention is placed on the different and specific needs women might have. Not all working women choose to have children, but those that do are put in a unique position: They are asked to consider how their absence from work will impact their job and finances, and how their absence from home will impact their child.

Moms are constantly asked to sacrifice; they are always taking one for the team.

These are big questions with long-term ramifications, and ones not asked (to such a great extent) of men. Workplaces need to recognize these differences, and learn how to be more sensitive to the conflicting interests a new mother may have. Supporting her choices and withholding judgment, as a boss or coworker, is a great place to start.

Our workaholic culture demands we place our careers as the first priority in life, and gives women a six-week maternity leave (the shortest in developed nations and the only one that doesn’t mandate paid leave). This is preferable for many women, who look forward to getting back to their jobs and responsibilities. For others, it’s extraordinarily difficult to leave their newborns so soon, but they aren't given an option to extend their time. This is a cross-party issue: Changing the length of paid maternity leave may be the one thing Megyn Kelly and Bernie Sanders seem to agree on.

Author and marketing executive Maddy Dychtwald says women are good for the economy and spend money more wisely than men.


I'm not a mother and have no intention of becoming one, for a myriad of reasons, including the fact that I consider pizza a suitable meal for breakfast, lunch, and/or dinner. But I have watched as my sister has dealt with the implications of leaving her daughter every day as she goes to work, and the epic questions she has had to face. Am I leaving her too soon? Am I going to miss something? Is this going to affect our bonding and attachment? It seems to me that being a new parent is stressful enough without these additional concerns.

Workplaces as well as the government need to work together to find a solution. New mothers should have the option to stay with their children longer if they so choose, be paid during that time, and the rest of us should cultivate a society that respects that. Moms are constantly asked to sacrifice; they are always taking one for the team. Maybe this time, the team could take one for them.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Ideology drives us apart. Neuroscience can bring us back together.

A guide to making difficult conversations possible—and peaceful—in an increasingly polarized nation.

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  • How can we reach out to people on the other side of the divide? Get to know the other person as a human being before you get to know them as a set of tribal political beliefs, says Sarah Ruger. Don't launch straight into the difficult topics—connect on a more basic level first.
  • To bond, use icebreakers backed by neuroscience and psychology: Share a meal, watch some comedy, see awe-inspiring art, go on a tough hike together—sharing tribulation helps break down some of the mental barriers we have between us. Then, get down to talking, putting your humanity before your ideology.
  • The Charles Koch Foundation is committed to understanding what drives intolerance and the best ways to cure it. The foundation supports interdisciplinary research to overcome intolerance, new models for peaceful interactions, and experiments that can heal fractured communities. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org/courageous-collaborations.

How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
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Why a federal judge ordered White House to restore Jim Acosta's press badge

A federal judge ruled that the Trump administration likely violated the reporter's Fifth Amendment rights when it stripped his press credentials earlier this month.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 16: CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta (R) returns to the White House with CNN Washington bureau chief Sam Feist after Federal judge Timothy J. Kelly ordered the White House to reinstate his press pass November 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. CNN has filed a lawsuit against the White House after Acosta's press pass was revoked after a dispute involving a news conference last week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Acosta will be allowed to return to the White House on Friday.
  • The judge described the ruling as narrow, and didn't rule one way or the other on violations of the First Amendment.
  • The case is still open, and the administration may choose to appeal the ruling.
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