Climate Change Will Cause Mass Human Displacement. How Can We Prepare?

In the next few decades, climate change is going to displace millions of people. Scott Leckie of Business Spectator has penned an article detailing his ideas on how world leaders need to prepare for this imminent crisis.

What's the Latest?


No matter what you believe (or choose not to believe) about climate change, it is impossible to deny that shifts in global weather patterns present an imminent threat to millions of people worldwide in countries such as Bangladesh, Panama, and the Marshall Islands. With the number of displaced people at its highest since World War II, the world is hardly prepared for what the UN estimates to be a humanitarian crisis to dwarf all current and past crises. The international community can't afford to wait until rising water levels and volatile storms send millions of refugees to the world's doorsteps. Preparations need to be made now.

What's the Big Idea?

Scott Leckie of Business Spectator has authored an article rife with suggestions for how to prepare for the imminent rise of the climate displaced. His most notable proposal is a preparation for mass migration:

"National and international land acquisition, planned and voluntary relocation, creating new national agencies and expanding political will, if implemented properly, can greatly reduce both the scale and suffering associated with this new form of coerced movement."

Leckie begins by estimating how much land would be needed to harbor and/or resettle 250 million displaced people (cumulatively about the size of Uganda). The world has no shortage of land and Leckie argues for making arrangements now to prepare for future inhabitants:

Setting aside land now for those requiring new land following the loss of their current land makes good sense, both in economic and human rights terms.

The issue of course is in getting a world's worth of disparate governments on the same page in order to tackle this issue head-on. Who will agree to take in the climate displaced ahead of time? How will political backlash against climate change affect preparations for its perils? Leckie's proposal is both noble and ambitious, which simultaneously makes it something of a pipe dream.

Read more at Business Spectator

Photo credit: Sangoiri / Shutterstock

Archaeologists unearth dozens of mummified cats in Egypt

Dozens of mummified cats were dug up this week. This isn't as shocking as you might think.

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
Culture & Religion
  • Archaeologists in Egypt have found dozens of mummified cats in the tomb of a royal offical.
  • The cats will join the ranks of hundreds of thousands of previously discovered ancient kitties.
  • While the cats are nothing special, the tomb also held well preserved beetles.
Keep reading Show less

Men obsessed with building muscle mass have higher mental health risks

They're at a higher risk for depression, weekend binge drinking, and unnecessary dieting.

Palestinian participants flex their muscles during a bodybuilding competition in Gaza city on October 28, 2016. / AFP / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Mind & Brain
  • Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows.
  • Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems.
  • Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed.
Keep reading Show less

The connection paradox: Why are workplaces more isolating than ever?

How poor work practices turn us all into remote workers.

Videos
  • Technology's supposed interconnectivity doesn't breed human interaction, and has instead made many workers feel less happy and less productive.
  • Using email rather than walking over to someone's desk and having face-to-face time is a major culprit. Inter-office messaging apps can also make employees feel more distant from their co-workers.
  • Can the tech companies who created this issue turn workplace isolation around, or is this the new normal?
Keep reading Show less