7 Technologies to Help You Sleep Better

Here are seven technologies, from apps to standalone devices, that can aid us in getting a better night's sleep. 

7 Technologies to Help You Sleep Better

Numerous studies have shown us how important sleep can be. Not only does it revitalize our bodies, it also gives the brain time to sort through all the information it has received throughout our hectic day. Sleep deprivation, and a lack of quality sleep, can lead to weight problems, high blood pressure, and a weaker immune system (amongst a host of other issues).


With our lives becoming increasingly mobile and multi-task oriented, getting the recommended eight hours can be difficult, and even when we do, the quality of our sleep might not be all that it should be. To combat a very physical and human problem, here are seven humanizing technologies, from apps to standalone devices, that can aid us in getting a better night's sleep. 

Apps:

Proactive Sleep

Proactive Sleep is a multifunction sleep app that includes basics like an alarm clock with snooze feature and ambient music. It also includes a more comprehensive “sleep diary” that lets users track their amount of sleep, difficulty falling asleep, exercise, caffeine consumption and more. The data is averaged and can be viewed in seven day cycles, 30 day cycles, or all days.

Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock

If you’re really committed to learning more about your sleep habits, Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock provides you with a tool for analyzing your sleep habits. By literally placing the iPhone next to you while you sleep, the app will monitor your movement and wake you in your lightest sleep phase so you arise feeling refreshed and well-rested.

Wearable:

Nyx Somnus Sleep Shirt

A nightshirt embedded with fabric electronics to monitor the wearer's breathing patterns. A small chip worn in a pocket of the shirt processes that data to determine the phase of sleep, such as REM sleep (when we dream), light sleep, or deep sleep.

Fitbit

A wireless-enabled wearable device that measures data such as the number of steps walked, quality of sleep, and other personal metrics.

Jawbone Up

A motionX powered GPS enabled health monitoring device which tracks the persons steps, sleep and its quality and food. It also features a "challenges" social feature where anybody using a UP can add challenge to be accepted by other users. 

Standalone Devices:

Zeo

An alarm clock that monitors sleep states (e.g.,REM) and attempts to wake people up in the best stage of sleep. The state of sleep is detected by a headband and a bedside base unit awakens the sleeper during the last light sleep phase before the desired waking time.

BAM Labs Smart Bed Monitoring Device

BAM Labs® Touch-free Life Care™ (TLC) System brings “smart” to the bed. The BAM Labs® TLC under mattress sensor and HIPAA-compliant cloud monitoring platform transforms any bed into a smart bed. The FDA registered TLC System empowers healthcare professionals and caregivers to easily and efficiently monitor essential health information wirelessly anytime and from anywhere – without attaching anything to the patient or resident.

No, the Yellowstone supervolcano is not ‘overdue’

Why mega-eruptions like the ones that covered North America in ash are the least of your worries.

Ash deposits of some of North America's largest volcanic eruptions.

Image: USGS - public domain
Strange Maps
  • The supervolcano under Yellowstone produced three massive eruptions over the past few million years.
  • Each eruption covered much of what is now the western United States in an ash layer several feet deep.
  • The last eruption was 640,000 years ago, but that doesn't mean the next eruption is overdue.
Keep reading Show less

What the rise of digital nomads can tell us about the next wave of remote working

The pandemic has many people questioning whether they ever want to go back to the office.

SEBASTIEN SALOM-GOMIS/AFP via Getty Images
Personal Growth

If one thing is clear about remote work, it's this: Many people prefer it and don't want their bosses to take it away.

Keep reading Show less

CRISPR: Can we control it?

The potential of CRISPR technology is incredible, but the threats are too serious to ignore.

Videos
  • CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is a revolutionary technology that gives scientists the ability to alter DNA. On the one hand, this tool could mean the elimination of certain diseases. On the other, there are concerns (both ethical and practical) about its misuse and the yet-unknown consequences of such experimentation.
  • "The technique could be misused in horrible ways," says counter-terrorism expert Richard A. Clarke. Clarke lists biological weapons as one of the potential threats, "Threats for which we don't have any known antidote." CRISPR co-inventor, biochemist Jennifer Doudna, echos the concern, recounting a nightmare involving the technology, eugenics, and a meeting with Adolf Hitler.
  • Should this kind of tool even exist? Do the positives outweigh the potential dangers? How could something like this ever be regulated, and should it be? These questions and more are considered by Doudna, Clarke, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, psychologist Steven Pinker, and physician Siddhartha Mukherjee.

Technology & Innovation

Smartly dressed: Researchers develop clothes that sense movement via touch

Measuring a person's movements and poses, smart clothes could be used for athletic training, rehabilitation, or health-monitoring.

Quantcast