Genius Series: The most influential scientist of all time

Big Think has launched a line of apparel and goods that celebrate the life and work of four geniuses.

  • Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! Buy here.
  • Our third genius is Sir Isaac Newton. His contributions to science are nearly impossible to overstate.
  • Select Rush or Super Rush Delivery to get your order before Christmas Day!


If I have seen further it is by standing on ye sholders of Giants.
– Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton is perhaps the most influential scientist of all time. He discovered and formulated the law of gravity, the classical laws of motion, the nature of color and optics, and invented calculus in his spare time. He invented the reflecting telescope, determined why the planets don't move in perfect circles, and he later went on to invent the little indentations around the side of coins when he was the Master of the Mint for Great Britain. His contributions to science are nearly impossible to overstate.

He's also the reason behind Neil deGrasse Tyson's classic meme.

Neil deGrasse Tyson: My man, Sir Isaac Newton


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