"No Means Yes, Yes Means Anal" Frat Banned From Yale

"No Means Yes, Yes Means Anal" Frat Banned From Yale

Yale University didn't wait for federal civil rights officials to determine whether the presence of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity was contributing to a hostile sexual environment. The University has banned George W. Bush's old frat from the campus for five years.


In October, members of DKE and pledges gathered at night, near the women's freshman dorms and chanted "No Means Yes, Yes Means Anal!" and "My name is Jack, I'm a necrophiliac, I fuck dead women and fill them with my semen."

This was one of a series of incidents involving frats using misogynistic rituals in their initiation rites. A group of Yale students and alumni alleged in a confidential report to the Department of Education that these and the university's failure to address complaints about sexual violence on campus constituted a hostile sexual environment. The investigation is ongoing.

[Photo credit: Yale art and architecture building, no particular relation to the DKE debacle, but a very cool image of the Yale campus. Lauren Manning, Creative Commons.]

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