Update on commenting

So, the folks here at Bigthink have been working on improving commenting for Eruptions (and all the BT blogs). I am happy to say that we've had a number of changes that will help - and some bugs are still being ironed out. A quick summary of what is new and improved:


- Linebreaks (preserved) and paragraph breaks (two returns - a blank line) work.

- Formatting is now done with coding from Textile. A subset of the total Textile formatting works in the comments:

  • link ("big think":http://bigthink.com)
  • blockquote (bq.)
  • bold (*text*)
  • italic (_text_)
  • superscript (^text^)
  • subscript (~text~)
  • deleted text (-text-)
  • numeric list (#)
  • bulleted list (*)
  • This should allow for a lot easier commenting and discussion on the post from the blog. As always, if you're having problems or have suggestions for improving the commenting, send me an email at eruptionsblog <at> gmail.com. Thanks for your help so far (and your patience!)

    UPDATE: Got word that some of the weirdness comes from the spam filter for comments - it is rejecting a lot of the obvious "test" comments. So, for the time being, limit the testing as best as you can - if you have trouble posting a normal comment, please let me know!

    Top left: A image of Semeru taken by (and courtesy of) Arnold Binas. You can see the original image here on his Flickr stream.

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