Forget LinkedIn, It May be Time to Find a Job on Facebook

The world's largest social network now has a feature, Jobs on Facebook, that is free for both job posters and job seekers. For millions of underemployed workers already on Facebook, it may be a welcome feature. 

Forget LinkedIn, It May be Time to Find a Job on Facebook

It may be time to find a job on Facebook


In a potentially game-changing tweak to the world's largest social network, Facebook is now allowing employers to post job openings directly to the site in the United States and Canada. While some companies had been using their pages to post openings, Facebook is now making a dedicated spot for those looking for work and those in need of workers to better find each other.

For users, this means that Facebook could become a one-stop-shop that merges their personal and professional lives. This subtle change may have a profound impact on LinkedIn's future, along with how you typically interact on Facebook.

The new feature is called "Jobs on Facebook," and it takes aim at the underemployed, freelance/independent contractors, and those that might not be actively seeking new employment.  The underemployment rate in the United States is currently 14.1%.

Whereas LinkedIn seems geared to traditional forms of employment with an emphasis on well-honed skills and experience, Jobs on Facebook may target lower-skilled positions and more transactional forms of work. The feature provides a simple "Apply Now" button where applicants will be able to add, edit, and review forms.

Our relationship with using both LinkedIn and Facebook is like a mullet: business up front, party in the back.

LinkedIn for business, Facebook for personal. LinkedIn was where we posted a professional profile photo, gave updates about our career and thoughts on our relative industry, and generally maintained a buttoned-up appearance. Facebook, on the other hand, was where we could let our hair down a little bit and get more personal.

It looks like a game changer to us #JobsOnFacebook https://t.co/huRQWnYIvA

— CVtoDublin (@CVtoDublin) February 15, 2017

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