Stephen King says writers should stop using this one "very tired" word

The 71-year-old author suggests replacing the adjective "amazing" with something more "pungent & specific".

Stephen King says writers should stop using this one "very tired" word
(Photo: BERTRAND LANGLOIS/AFP/Getty Images)
  • In a tweet published Sunday night, Stephen King asked writers to stop using the word "amazing".
  • Many users agreed, also suggesting that similarly overused adjectives like "awesome" be retired.
  • In his 2000 bestselling book "On Writing: A Memoir to the Craft", King offered similar advice on overusing adverbs.

"Amazing" is one adjective that aspiring writers should nix and replace with something more "pungent & specific," according to author Stephen King.

Note to writers: "Amazing" is very tired. "Amazing" needs a long vacation. Therefore, please don't write about your amazing party, your amazing girlfriend's amazing dress, or your amazing vacation. Something more pungent & specific, please.
— Stephen King (@StephenKing) October 29, 2018

When you catch an adjective, kill it

In a letter to a friend, Mark Twain once wrote that overusing adjectives can turn into a bad habit:

"When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them—then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit, once fastened upon a person, is as hard to get rid of as any other vice."

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