Stephen King says writers should stop using this one "very tired" word

The 71-year-old author suggests replacing the adjective "amazing" with something more "pungent & specific".

  • In a tweet published Sunday night, Stephen King asked writers to stop using the word "amazing".
  • Many users agreed, also suggesting that similarly overused adjectives like "awesome" be retired.
  • In his 2000 bestselling book "On Writing: A Memoir to the Craft", King offered similar advice on overusing adverbs.

"Amazing" is one adjective that aspiring writers should nix and replace with something more "pungent & specific," according to author Stephen King.

Note to writers: "Amazing" is very tired. "Amazing" needs a long vacation. Therefore, please don't write about your amazing party, your amazing girlfriend's amazing dress, or your amazing vacation. Something more pungent & specific, please.
— Stephen King (@StephenKing) October 29, 2018

When you catch an adjective, kill it

In a letter to a friend, Mark Twain once wrote that overusing adjectives can turn into a bad habit:

"When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them—then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit, once fastened upon a person, is as hard to get rid of as any other vice."

3D printing might save your life one day. It's transforming medicine and health care.

What can 3D printing do for medicine? The "sky is the limit," says Northwell Health researcher Dr. Todd Goldstein.

Northwell Health
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Medical professionals are currently using 3D printers to create prosthetics and patient-specific organ models that doctors can use to prepare for surgery.
  • Eventually, scientists hope to print patient-specific organs that can be transplanted safely into the human body.
  • Northwell Health, New York State's largest health care provider, is pioneering 3D printing in medicine in three key ways.
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  • The goal is to expand one's limited "brain attic," so that what used to be a small space can suddenly become much larger because we are using the space more efficiently.

Active ingredient in Roundup found in 95% of studied beers and wines

The controversial herbicide is everywhere, apparently.

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Surprising Science
  • U.S. PIRG tested 20 beers and wines, including organics, and found Roundup's active ingredient in almost all of them.
  • A jury on August 2018 awarded a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma victim $289 million in Roundup damages.
  • Bayer/Monsanto says Roundup is totally safe. Others disagree.
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  • By the end of it, you'll understand the pitfalls of your subjective risk perception system so that you can avoid these traps in the future.