Stephen King says writers should stop using this one "very tired" word

The 71-year-old author suggests replacing the adjective "amazing" with something more "pungent & specific".

  • In a tweet published Sunday night, Stephen King asked writers to stop using the word "amazing".
  • Many users agreed, also suggesting that similarly overused adjectives like "awesome" be retired.
  • In his 2000 bestselling book "On Writing: A Memoir to the Craft", King offered similar advice on overusing adverbs.

"Amazing" is one adjective that aspiring writers should nix and replace with something more "pungent & specific," according to author Stephen King.

Generally agreeing that "amazing" should be descriptor non grata, Twitter users offered other words that could be used to describe that which astonishes or causes great wonder.

Many on Twitter said 'awesome' should also be shelved.

It's not the first time King has taken to Twitter to offer writing advice.

However, the bulk of King's instructional wisdom lies in his 2000 book 'On Writing: A Memoir to the Craft', in which he also decried the overuse of adverbs: "I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs, and I will shout it from the rooftops."

When you catch an adjective, kill it

In a letter to a friend, Mark Twain once wrote that overusing adjectives can turn into a bad habit:

"When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them—then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit, once fastened upon a person, is as hard to get rid of as any other vice."

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