Indirect Truths: Gore Aims to Go Beyond His Base

I'm hitting the road for talks at Princeton, but a quick post on Gore's new ad campaign, launched officially with an appearance last night on 60 Minutes.

I haven't see the ads yet and I didn't see last night's program, but from news reports, the campaign appears to incorporate the types of necessary strategies that I've written about at this blog, in articles, or that I have highlighted in talks over the past year. Gore and his Climate Alliance specifically:

a) Attempt to reach non-news audiences, the type of people who have been tuning out the really good science coverage.

b) In commercials titled "strange bedfellows" and "unlikely alliances" they try to fashion messages and use spokespeople that will try to reach beyond the Democratic base that was mobilized by Inconvenient Truth.

c) They try to take advantage of opinion leader networks and mobilization, linking the spots to a buzz marketing campaign.

I will have probably much more to post about this new campaign once I am back from Princeton and after I have been able to see all of the ads.

But for now, from a Boston Globe article on the campaign:


"The whole idea of the campaign is to be inclusive and to be bipartisan and to bring people together to a place where meaningful change can happen," an organizer said. "It aims to be a game-changer in terms of the politics of climate."

The alliance already has more than a million e-mail addresses, and the goal is to sign up more than 10 million global warming activists.

"For the new Congress and the new president to get something meaningful done, it will take the American people demanding change," the organizer said.

In addition to the ads on television, in print and online, the campaign will include a huge grass-roots mobilization effort.

"It's going to be much more of a referential, network-focused campaign as opposed to high-profile people telling you what to do," the organizer said. "Hopefully, it's going to be your friends and neighbors encouraging you to get involved."

'Upstreamism': Your zip code affects your health as much as genetics

Upstreamism advocate Rishi Manchanda calls us to understand health not as a "personal responsibility" but a "common good."

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Upstreamism tasks health care professionals to combat unhealthy social and cultural influences that exist outside — or upstream — of medical facilities.
  • Patients from low-income neighborhoods are most at risk of negative health impacts.
  • Thankfully, health care professionals are not alone. Upstreamism is increasingly part of our cultural consciousness.
Keep reading Show less

In U.S. first, drug company faces criminal charges for distributing opioids

It marks a major shift in the government's battle against the opioid crisis.

George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The nation's sixth-largest drug distributor is facing criminal charges related to failing to report suspicious drug orders, among other things.
  • It marks the first time a drug company has faced criminal charges for distributing opioids.
  • Since 1997, nearly 222,000 Americans have died from prescription opioids, partly thanks to unethical doctors who abuse the system.
Keep reading Show less

Following sex, some men have unexpected feelings – study

A new study shows that some men's reaction to sex is not what you'd expect, resulting in a condition previously observed in women.

Credit: Pixabay
Sex & Relationships
  • A new study shows men's feelings after sex can be complex.
  • Some men reportedly get sad and upset.
  • The condition affected 41% of men in the study
Keep reading Show less

Calling out Cersei Lannister: Elizabeth Warren reviews Game of Thrones

The real Game of Thrones might be who best leverages the hit HBO show to shape political narratives.

Photo credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren argues that Game of Thrones is primarily about women in her review of the wildly popular HBO show.
  • Warren also touches on other parallels between the show and our modern world, such as inequality, political favoritism of the elite, and the dire impact of different leadership styles on the lives of the people.
  • Her review serves as another example of using Game of Thrones as a political analogy and a tool for framing political narratives.
Keep reading Show less