Whom would you like to interview and what would you ask?

Question: Whom would you like to interview and what would you ask?

Jason Kottke: That’s a good question. Well it’s fitting __________. I’m a big fan or Errol Morris. I don’t know if I would love to interview him because I think it would be so intimidating. And I think very quickly he would probably turn it into an interview of me, which I don’t know if that would be so interesting for him.

But I think it would be fascinating to sit down and chat with him. I mean and another person I would say just off the top of my head is David Remnick, he’s the Editor-in-Chief of the New Yorker. I had an opportunity to sit down with him for about an hour once. And it was . . . he was really fascinating. I mean, he’s a fascinating person, and I think he, like . . . The New Yorker is pretty much my model of what I want to do with Kottke.org without; I don’t want to start writing 6,000 word, you know, essays on a rock; but I do want to show that same level of sort of, you know, editorship as I think that he does in the New Yorker. So I guess ____________.

 

 October 9, 2007

Kottke is a big Errol Morris fan.

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