Re: Strings Attached?

David Dollar: You know I think any big country that's providing assistance has its own national interests. That's true for China. It's  true for the United States. It's true for France and other countries. I don't mean to just pick on those. So I think the recipient governments are aware of this. Personally I think it's a little bit patronizing to be worried that African countries cannot manage Chinese assistance. It's  like somehow big brother from the United States and Europe has to keep an eye on the Africans. I don't accept that. I think African countries can mange this relationship. I am sure the Chinese will make some mistakes in Africa, but it really depends on African governments, African societies to try to manage that. Now having said that, it is clear the Chinese are trying to establish ties with a number of countries that have oil and gas reserves some of which, from my point of view, have rather poor governance, such as Sudan, Angola. I am not sure Zimbabwe has oil and gas, but certainly it's  an important partner for China. And as a friendly observer, I tell my Chinese friends that I don't think trying to lock in oil and gas supplies from some of these countries is a very smart strategy for any country. They all possess rather minor amounts of oil and gas compared to the whole world set of reserves. They're only a few countries that really have major reserves. Russia, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait. Almost everybody else is a small player. So locking in supply from a small player doesn't have any big effect on the equation. And I think the whole notion of locking in supplies is a little bit illusory. If the government changes in any of these countries, then the fact that the Chinese supported the previous government may very well come back to haunt them. So I see China perhaps making some of the mistakes that France, and the United States, and other big powers have made. And my own personal view is you don't get security of supply by trying to lock in a relationship with some of these unstable governments. I think real security of supply comes from well-functioning markets, and it'sin the interest of all the big economic powers to have well functioning markets in oil and gas. That's the best hope for security in world energy markets over the next couple of decades.

Recorded on: 7/3/07

 

China's foreign aid, Dollar says, is no different from anyone

In U.S. first, drug company faces criminal charges for distributing opioids

It marks a major shift in the government's battle against the opioid crisis.

George Frey/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The nation's sixth-largest drug distributor is facing criminal charges related to failing to report suspicious drug orders, among other things.
  • It marks the first time a drug company has faced criminal charges for distributing opioids.
  • Since 1997, nearly 222,000 Americans have died from prescription opioids, partly thanks to unethical doctors who abuse the system.
Keep reading Show less

'Upstreamism': Your zip code affects your health as much as genetics

Upstreamism advocate Rishi Manchanda calls us to understand health not as a "personal responsibility" but a "common good."

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Upstreamism tasks health care professionals to combat unhealthy social and cultural influences that exist outside — or upstream — of medical facilities.
  • Patients from low-income neighborhoods are most at risk of negative health impacts.
  • Thankfully, health care professionals are not alone. Upstreamism is increasingly part of our cultural consciousness.
Keep reading Show less

Calling out Cersei Lannister: Elizabeth Warren reviews Game of Thrones

The real Game of Thrones might be who best leverages the hit HBO show to shape political narratives.

Photo credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren argues that Game of Thrones is primarily about women in her review of the wildly popular HBO show.
  • Warren also touches on other parallels between the show and our modern world, such as inequality, political favoritism of the elite, and the dire impact of different leadership styles on the lives of the people.
  • Her review serves as another example of using Game of Thrones as a political analogy and a tool for framing political narratives.
Keep reading Show less