How should the Bible be interpreted?

Question: How should the Bible be interpreted?

 

David Chang:  Someone’s going to shoot me.

 

Here’s the thing.  I always compare it to this.  Like you’ll have somebody that is going to invest in a mutual fund, or invest in a business, and they’re going to study forever, like, to get as much research as possible about investing in a business or their life savings or about the company or whatever. 

That same person will blindly read the Bible and be like, “This is the absolute fact.” 

I will not be able to take away their commitment, or their faith, or their belief in faith.  Because my faith in reason or science is just as viable as their faith in what I consider to be a complete absurdity.  

I think that the Bible is totally misinterpreted.  The interpretation has changed, and I think that’s the failure of church, of organized religion.  The Bible itself is totally fine, but it’s the interpretation that’s caused the problem. 

It might be a little bit different.  Like hidden in the message was the theory of relativity or something like that.  But not to sound crazy or anything, but I feel that, over the years, the Bible has continued to be reinterpreted to the benefit of a certain organization of such.

If you’re going to believe in the Bible, you should understand.  You should learn Greek. You should learn what was going on in the day it was created and everything that happened. 

It’s a real touchy subject.  I definitely piss off a lot of people, so I don’t talk about it too much.  But I think that it should be studied more.  I think blind faith is fine, but you know it’s totally absurd sometimes.

 

If you believe in the Bible, Chang says, you should understand it.

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