Carol Gilligan on ‘In A Different Voice’

Carol Gilligan: I sat down to write this essay, was the first thing I think I ever wrote, that wasn’t for school to make sense to myself of why it was so hard for women to say what they felt or thought and be heard without having it distorted and come back to them in some way that just did not even sound like what they where trying to say and also how come I hadn’t seen the absence of women from the psychology I was teaching. So, I thought may be my mother would read this book or people who worked on the same floor I worked on it at Harvard, it never occurred to me, but I wrote this paper and it started to circulate like almost as a kind of underground thing. So, that was a huge discovery for me just really huge I did expected, Harvard press when they published the book, they published 3000 copies, nobody expected.  It’s had a huge impact, I mean I will tell you like one good example, which is women use to be seen as unintelligent, because we were set to be emotional, men where rational and women were emotional. Well, honestly if you think about that ridiculous, because men have feelings and women think kind of though. So, now we have this high phase emotional intelligence and it’s a big wanted face, because it’s cooperation are suppose to incorporate it and people forget that where that came from was this work questioning this division between emotional women and intelligent humans and saying when you join these qualities which had been as seen as women’s qualities with human quality here those where all human quality. So, we have emotion intelligence and relation of self and most recently the feeling brain and that means that the whole paradigm has changed.

Carol Gilligan recounts a much greater impact than expected.

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Shogo Hamada/Cornell University
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Credit: Petr Kratochvil. PublicDomainPictures.net.
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