Being Dave Chappelle’s “Puerto Rican Bodyguard”

Question: After all these serious questions—who’s your favorite comedian?

Ben Jealous: Dave Chappelle.  Dave's my godbrother.  So, I'm a little bit biased.  And we came of age together in New York City, me in college and he at the Boston Comedy Club, which was a college of sorts for him.  I was actually known to some as Dave's Puerto Rican bodyguard because they didn't know exactly what to make of the guy who didn't smile much and who just sat in the back of the club reading books.  They didn't realize that I was at Columbia University, and the only way I could have the privilege of hanging out at the comedy club is if I read books while somebody else was telling jokes.  So.  Yeah, Dave's definitely my favorite comic.

Recorded March 10th, 2010
Interviewed by Austin Allen

The NAACP president’s favorite comedian is also his godbrother.

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Sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies
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Sponsored by John Templeton Foundation
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Surprising Science
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Politics & Current Affairs
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Credit: DeepMind
Technology & Innovation
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