Andrew Cohen on the Danger of Organized Religion

Card: Is organized religion dangerous?

 

Andrew Cohen:  Well, of course it is but that doesn’t mean it’s wrong. Whenever a group of individuals comes together and agrees on any truth that sets that particular group up in opposition to others. Now human beings have been agreeing and disagreeing in collectives since the beginning of human culture and that- and we will continue to do so. It’s just that there are certain lines that get crossed when these kinds of gatherings do become, quote, unquote, dangerous, but then I also want to interpret the word dangerous in a positive sense because I think we also want to know that when we’re taking great leaps forward, when we’re- great innovative leaps forward in to higher potentials, individuals and groups like that are also seen as being dangerous, but in this case they would be dangerous for the most positive of reasons. 

Danger can be a good thing.

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