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We Need to Get Back to Journeying Again

Every time we learn something it’s a journey.  We think we understand it, then we keep going, then we get confused again.  

We know that life is a journey.  Our friendships are journeys.  Every time we learn something it’s a journey.  We think we understand it, then we keep going, then we get confused again.  Then we emerge out of this dark valley of confusion into a new plane and plateau of understanding. 

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Trust is a Drug

Neuroscientists have since proven that trust is akin to a drug literally because oxytocin is released in the brain when someone feels that someone is trusting them. 

We think that trust is outside of us.  We go looking for it.  Can we trust this vendor.  Before we hire this person or let them spend ten dollars of company money.  Are they trustworthy?  Aristotle taught us that trust does not exist in the person being trusted.  The virtue of trust lies in giving it away.  Because when you give trust away, you’re giving the power to the other person to let you down or do right by you.  And the virtue of trust lies in taking that risk in giving trust away.

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Welcome to the 'Era of Behavior'

As the world has gone from connected to interconnected to interdependent, I believe we’ve entered a new era.

As the world has gone from connected to interconnected to interdependent, I believe we’ve entered a new era.  What I call the era of behavior.  I acknowledge that behavior has always mattered.  What I’m saying is that behavior now matters more than ever and in ways it never has before.  And what I mean by behavior – it’s not just doing the right principle, the responsible thing.  

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The Paradox of Success

Inspirational leaders understand and can scale the distinction between doing something and, as capitalists, making money versus doing something in order to make money. 

We philosophers deal in paradoxes.  And probably the most known and ancient paradox is the paradox of happiness.  That if you pursue happiness directly it tends to allude you.  But if you do things that are meaningful, are valuable to others, things that you’re really passionate about because you find inherent value in them, you create the space for happiness to find you.  To understand happiness is to know you can’t pursue it directly.

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//This will actually fire event. Should be called after consent was verifed