Coparenting: A lifestyle innovation from our broke middle class

Economic necessity and growing isolation are making some middle-class families try coparenting, explains author Alissa Quart.

Videos
  • Economic necessity and growing isolation are making some middle-class families try coparenting, explains author Alissa Quart.
  • Is the practice of sharing living spaces and parenting responsibilities across families a depressing trend or a "revolutionary" adaptation?

The end of the middle class: Why prosperity is failing in America

Sky-high rent, second jobs, and wealth-worshipping 1% TV shows—journalist Alissa Quart explains how the American dream became a dystopia, and why it's so hard for middle-class Americans to get by.

Politics & Current Affairs

'Middle class' doesn't mean what it used to. Owning a home, two cars, and having a summer vacation to look forward to is a dream that's no longer possible for a growing percentage of American families. So what's changed? That safe and stable class has become shaky as unions collapsed, the gig economy surged, and wealth concentrated in the hands of the top 1%, the knock-on effects of which include sky-high housing prices, people working second jobs, and a cultural shift marked by 'one-percent' TV shows (and presidents). Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, explains how the American dream became a dystopia, and why it's so hard for middle-class Americans to get by. Alissa Quart is the author of Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America

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