New study challenges the narrative that meat is 'manly'

New research suggests some men identify with a new form of masculinity that values authenticity, domesticity, and holistic self-awareness.

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  • Media and societal norms have been feeding us the same "meat is manly" ideology for decades, maybe without many of us realizing it.
  • A new study questions the stereotypical narrative that real men eat meat by taking a look at the variation in how men identify themselves and their values.
  • The psychological link between meat and masculinity will likely remain alive and well, however, this study (and others that follow suit) can continue to challenge the narrative.
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Yoga may ease symptoms of depression, according to new research

According to the analysis, the more yoga sessions a person did each week, the less they struggled with depressive symptoms.

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  • Depressive disorders are the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting over 340 million people.
  • According to a new study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, yoga sessions may be able to ease depressive symptoms in people with mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder.
  • Mindfulness, meditation, and breathing control techniques are all things that have been proven effective in reducing depressive symptoms. Traditional yoga practices typically include a combination of these things and therefore may actually have more of a positive impact.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is causing an increase in relapses. Here are signs to look for.

Being aware of this issue is a big first step in helping vulnerable communities (such as those struggling with addiction) combat relapse during this pandemic.

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  • Many mental health and addiction professionals are worried that the lockdown, quarantine and isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will cause a surge in relapses of individuals who are struggling with sobriety at this time.
  • Stress, loneliness, isolation, boredom and a lack of support for the addiction community are the biggest triggers for relapse right now.
  • However, being aware of these triggers and supporting those in your life struggling with addiction through the help of online platforms can be a way to combat relapses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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How to maximize performance and minimize stress during the COVID-19 pandemic

Flow Research Collective COO Rian Doris explains how to harness the power of your nervous system to find your flow during a pandemic.

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  • Knowing the difference between healthy stress (eustress) and unhealthy stress (distress) can help you maximize your performance during difficult times.
  • The Flow Research Collective helps to decode the flow states of your mind so you can live (and work) in the zone, even during a pandemic.
  • COO of The Flow Research Collective, Rian Doris, explains how to find your maximum potential and harness the power of your nervous system to work for you instead of against you.
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The hunger-boredom paradigm explained by scientists

Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains the neuroscience behind eating out of boredom (and how to stop).

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  • True hunger builds gradually and can be satisfied by any source of food, while emotional eating (which includes eating out of boredom) is insatiable and generally leads to feelings of guilt or shame.
  • One 2015 study suggests we eat to escape the self-awareness that comes in moments of boredom or inactivity, while Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains there may be a neuroscientific reason we eat to escape boredom.
  • Drinking water, occupying your brain with a hobby or craft, exercising or striking up a fun conversation with someone are all ways you can beat the boredom-hunger paradigm.
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