Alan Watts and the art of meditation

Forget everything you think you know about meditation.

  • Alan Watts cuts to the root of what meditation really is all about.
  • Meditative practice has no motive, except to experience the present moment.
  • Practice a guided meditation by focusing on the now.
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Why family group texts cause anxiety, and how to escape them

If texting 'is starting to feel frustrating, stressful, or if you're overwhelmed or trapped by it, that's a good indication that you need to set a boundary.'

I am not known for being especially easy to get hold of via text. I tend to keep my phone on silent as the high-pitched ping of an incoming message makes my cheeks flush with dread. I wish I could mute all my contacts' notifications – sorry, mom, dad, and everyone I care about, but communicating with you makes me incredibly anxious.

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A personalized approach to treating anxiety and depression

New research from the University of Buffalo makes the case for the smartphone.

Photo by Lily Banse on Unsplash
  • Kristin Gainey, a psychology professor at the University of Buffalo, says that an individualized approach to treating anxiety and depression is possible.
  • 135 volunteers were sent three daily surveys for ten weeks to check for emotional triggers and mindsets.
  • Gainey believes that smartphone tracking could provide better avenues of research for treating mental health problems.
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Why radicals can't recognize when they're wrong

It's not just ostriches who stick their head in the sand.

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  • Not only does everyone have personal experience with how difficult it can be to change people's minds, but there's also empirical research showing why this is the case.
  • A new study in Current Biology explains why some people seem to be constitutionally incapable of admitting they're wrong.
  • The study shows the underlying mechanism behind being bull-headed, and there may be some ways to get better at recognizing when you're wrong.
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Photo credit: Ian Stauffer on Unsplash
  • Practicing self-compassion is shown to reduce arousal and increase parasympathetic activation in a new study.
  • Feeling comfortable in your skin leads to higher-order emotions, such as empathy and compassion.
  • Buddha realized this millennia ago when prescribing compassion as the path to self-realization.
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