Can fake news help you remember real facts better?

A 2020 study published in the journal of Psychological Science explores the idea that fake news can actually help you remember real facts better.

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  • In 2019, researchers at Stanford Engineering analyzed the spread of fake news as if it were a strain of Ebola. They adapted a model for understanding diseases that can infect a person more than once to better understand how fake news spreads and gains traction.
  • A new study published in 2020 explores the idea that fake news can actually help you remember real facts better.
  • "These findings demonstrate one situation in which misinformation reminders can diminish the negative effects of fake-news exposure in the short term," researchers on the project explained.
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An extra half-hour of sleep shown to improve mindfulness

A new study of nurses shows the importance of sleep—and staying aware on the job.

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  • A study of nurses found that an extra 29 minutes of sleep dramatically improved job-related mindfulness.
  • Nurses that reported higher mindfulness scores were 66 percent less likely to experience symptoms of insomnia.
  • Roughly 70 million American adults suffer from some form of sleep disorder.
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How does your brain make split second decisions?

Researchers explore the "complex web of connections" in your brain that allows you to make split second decisions.

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  • Researchers at the University of Colorado discovered the cerebellum's role in split-second decision making.
  • While it was previously thought that the cerebellum was in charge of these decisions, it's been uncovered that it is more like a "complex web of connections" through the brain that goes into how you make choices.
  • If the decision is made within 100 milliseconds (of being presented with the choice), the change of mind will succeed in altering the original course of action.
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What is neurodiversity?

Creating a better understanding by clearing up common misconceptions about the neurodiversity movement.

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  • The neurodiversity movement began in the late 1990s with sociologist Judy Singer.
  • Previously (and in many places, currently), these neurological differences were considered medical deficits.
  • Neurodiversity is the concept that there are many different variations of human functionality and that each and every variation needs to be better understood and respected.
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Teen popularity linked to increased depression in adolescence, decreased depression in adulthood

The results of this study showed depressive symptoms being highest in adolescence, declining in early adulthood and then climbing back up again into one's early 30s.

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  • A 2020 Michigan State University study examined the link between teen social networks and the levels of depression later in life.
  • This study used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, specifically targeting social network data. The results showed depressive symptoms being highest in adolescence and declining in early adulthood, then climbing back up again into one's early 30s.
  • There are several ways you can attempt to stay active and socially connected while battling depression, according to experts.
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