Work-from-home promises and corporate culture ‘BS’ are just burning employees out

Many workers moved home on the promise or hope that they'd be able to keep working remotely at least some of the time after the pandemic ended.

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As vaccinations and relaxed health guidelines make returning to the office a reality for more companies, there seems to be a disconnect between managers and their workers over remote work.

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A brief history of the internet's 3000 emojis

Curious about the most used emoji on social media?

2020 saw the release of 117 new emojis including the bubble tea, the placard and the transgender flag, growing the number of the popular pictograms to 3,136.
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The science behind ‘us vs. them’

Humans may have evolved to be tribalistic. Is that a bad thing?

  • From politics to every day life, humans have a tendency to form social groups that are defined in part by how they differ from other groups.
  • Neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky, author Dan Shapiro, and others explore the ways that tribalism functions in society, and discuss how—as social creatures—humans have evolved for bias.
  • But bias is not inherently bad. The key to seeing things differently, according to Beau Lotto, is to "embody the fact" that everything is grounded in assumptions, to identify those assumptions, and then to question them.

If you hate your job, blame the Agricultural Revolution

Hunter-gatherers probably had more spare time than you.

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  • For the species Homo sapiens, the Agricultural Revolution was a good deal, allowing the population to grow and culture to advance. But was it a good deal for individuals?
  • Hunter-gatherers likely led lives requiring far less daily work than farmers, leading one anthropologist to call them the "original affluent society."
  • The transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers may have occurred as a kind of trap in which the possibility of surplus during good years created population increases that had to be maintained.
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16 values children learned from pop culture in the past 50 years

A 50-year study reveals changing values children learned from pop culture.

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  • A new study tracked changes in values tweens (8-12 years old) get from popular culture.
  • The researchers compared 16 values over a 50-year-period.
  • The report was created by the UCLA's Center for Scholars and Storytellers.
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