Archaeologists solve the enigma of Ice Age mammoth bone circles

Strange bone circles made from mammoths revealed clues about how ancient communities survived Europe's last ice age.

Credit: Alex Pryor
  • Archaeologists found new clues to the purpose of the bone circles in Russia and Ukraine from the last Ice Age.
  • The previous theories assumed they were used for dwellings.
  • The new finds indicate they were used partially for fuel and had remains of different plants.
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Secret bunker from WWII found in Scotland

Winston Churchill had a secret army, and bunkers like this would have hidden them during a German invasion.

Image: © FLS/AOC Archaeology
  • Scottish foresters have recently stumbled on a hidden bunker dating back to WWII.
  • It is one of hundreds of bunkers designed to hide a secret guerrilla army in the event of a German invasion.
  • For the sake of protecting the site, its precise location will not be made public.
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Valentine’s Day: A watered-down pagan Lupercalia

Romans didn't do festivals half-way.

Image source: Public Domain / Wikimedia
  • Modern Valentine's Day is a far more restrained version of the pagan holiday it replaced.
  • During Lupercalia, Romans got naked, drunk, and there was whipping involved.
  • Romantic cards? How about simulated penetration?
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3 pieces of historical evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ

Was Jesus a real historical figure? Here's what we know.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Photo: Getty Images.
  • Jesus's historical existence is generally accepted among scholars.
  • The evidence for the reality of Jesus Christ includes writings by historians, artifacts and eyewitness accounts.
  • The spiritual and miraculous nature of Jesus is a different story.
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DNA analysis may have finally revealed what killed 15 million Aztecs

15 million Aztecs were probably killed by a form of salmonella the Spanish brought from Europe.

Aztec gladiators fight each other on a raised stone plinth. Image source: Rischgitz / Getty Images
  • When Europeans arrived in North America, they brought pathogens that natives were not immune to.
  • Smallpox wiped out 5-8 million Aztecs shortly after the Spanish arrived in Mexico in 1519.
  • But a different disease entirely is now suspected to have killed 15 million Aztecs, ending their society.
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