What does kindness look like? It wears a mask.

Northwell Health CEO Michael Dowling has an important favor to ask of the American people.

  • Michael Dowling is president and CEO of Northwell Health, the largest health care system in New York state. In this PSA, speaking as someone whose company has seen more COVID-19 patients than any other in the country, Dowling implores Americans to wear masks—not only for their own health, but for the health of those around them.
  • The CDC reports that there have been close to 7.9 million cases of coronavirus reported in the United States since January. Around 216,000 people have died from the virus so far with hundreds more added to the tally every day. Several labs around the world are working on solutions, but there is currently no vaccine for COVID-19.
  • The most basic thing that everyone can do to help slow the spread is to practice social distancing, wash your hands, and to wear a mask. The CDC recommends that everyone ages two and up wear a mask that is two or more layers of material and that covers the nose, mouth, and chin. Gaiters and face shields have been shown to be less effective at blocking droplets. Homemade face coverings are acceptable, but wearers should make sure they are constructed out of the proper materials and that they are washed between uses. Wearing a mask is the most important thing you can do to save lives in your community.
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Deep empathy: How AI can strengthen doctor-patient connections

Some experts may worry that AI will depersonalize health care, but others see its potential to deepen relationships.

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  • Today's rate of innovation and change has made it difficult for patients and physicians to effectively integrate technology into medical best practices.
  • Experts agree that physicians need more time in their day to build bonds with patients.
  • Dr. Eric Topol believes that artificial intelligence may help restore that time, creating what he calls "deep medicine."
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Telemedicine: The future of health care is already here

Technology that enables telemedicine is set to change the medical field for patients, doctors, and investors.

  • Digital technologies that disrupted industries like communication and transportation are steadily changing health care, too.
  • Virtual health care will save consumers money while growing the industry by billions of dollars.
  • Non-visit care combined with smartphone apps will give patients more power over their health care.
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3D printing might save your life one day. It's transforming medicine and health care.

What can 3D printing do for medicine? The "sky is the limit," says Northwell Health researcher Dr. Todd Goldstein.

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Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Medical professionals are currently using 3D printers to create prosthetics and patient-specific organ models that doctors can use to prepare for surgery.
  • Eventually, scientists hope to print patient-specific organs that can be transplanted safely into the human body.
  • Northwell Health, New York State's largest health care provider, is pioneering 3D printing in medicine in three key ways.
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Getting mental health care makes the body healthier — especially for the elderly

Taking care of our minds is an often neglected aspect of aging. What are we going to do about it?

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Studies have shown that depression can worsen in our old age.
  • Other mental health concerns, too, are not only debilitating on their own but they can often make it more difficult to treat other health conditions.
  • However, recent advances in how we treat mental health in the elderly are making a big difference. Here's how.
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'Upstreamism': Your zip code affects your health as much as genetics

Upstreamism advocate Rishi Manchanda calls us to understand health not as a "personal responsibility" but a "common good."

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Upstreamism tasks health care professionals to combat unhealthy social and cultural influences that exist outside — or upstream — of medical facilities.
  • Patients from low-income neighborhoods are most at risk of negative health impacts.
  • Thankfully, health care professionals are not alone. Upstreamism is increasingly part of our cultural consciousness.
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