Apple, Amazon, and Uber are moving in on health care. Will it help?

Big tech is making its opening moves into the health care scene, but its focus on tech-savvy millennials may miss the mark.

  • Companies like Apple, Amazon, and Google have been busy investing in health care companies, developing new apps, and hiring health professionals for new business ventures.
  • Their current focus appears to be on tech-savvy millennials, but the bulk of health care expenditures goes to the elderly.
  • Big tech should look to integrating its most promising health care devise, the smartphone, more thoroughly into health care.
Keep reading Show less

Why health care should start long before you reach the hospital

The issues that determine your health go way beyond seeing your doctor.

  • The average American spends about 24 hours a year at the doctor's office.
  • What you do the other 364 days a year mostly determines your health.
  • Michael Dowling discusses Northwell's focus on environmental, social, economic and other social determinants of health.
Keep reading Show less

The unexpected cost of living for a very long time

100 years ago, you could expect to live to 54. Our luxurious, 80-year-long lives come at a cost.

  • Medical advances have increased our longevity by decades, says Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health. That benefit comes with an unintended disadvantage – high costs.
  • Bringing the overall cost of health care down is near impossible, as an increased life expectancy brings new diseases and procedures with it.
  • Reducing the out-of-pocket cost is a separate issue, however. It is possible and necessary to lower costs so they don't become a barrier to people seeking care.
Keep reading Show less

Technology is revolutionizing health care — for better and for worse

The future of health care is high tech. That's good news — mostly.

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Health care is at the forefront of technology and innovation. Telehealth, bioelectronic medicine, and big data improve the quality of patient care while reducing the cost.
  • As wearable devices and implants offering real-time health data to everyday people become staples of modern life, people will discover conditions that were previously undetectable. They will also perceive illnesses that aren't there.
  • This supposedly cost-cutting technology may become an enormous burden to health care providers.
Keep reading Show less

How health care quietly powers the U.S. economy

What have hospitals done for us lately? Actually, quite a lot.

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • There is enormous job growth happening in the health care sector. It added 346,000 new jobs in 2018, outpacing every other sector.
  • Hospitals economically sustain large communities not only through medical care but through ancillary industries such as construction, laundry, maintenance and food service jobs.
  • Hospitals are a silent but mighty economic engine. Closing down hospitals rather than revitalizing where possible can deprive struggling communities even further.
Keep reading Show less