Pornography has been linked to easier, better orgasms in women

This study has linked female porn consumption to orgasms that are easier to achieve and more satisfying during both masturbation and partnered sex.

woman in bed holding smart phone

A new study has linked the use of pornography to better sexual outcomes in women.

Photo by Oleg Elkov on Shutterstock
  • A new study has linked the use of pornography to better sexual outcomes for women.
  • Researchers had 2,433 women complete an anonymous survey in which they provided both demographic information and completed several assessments related to their sex lives. Both masturbation and partnered sex were taken into account.
  • Studies like this can alter misconceptions about how porn impacts our relationships.

    A new study has linked the use of pornography to better sexual outcomes in women. In fact, according to this new research, the use of pornography among women is associated with several positive outcomes including better orgasms that are easier to achieve.

    "In this particular study, we examined whether frequency of pornography use during masturbation can predict sexual response outcomes such as difficulty reaching orgasm, latency to orgasm, and orgasmic pleasure during both masturbation and partnered sex," explains study author Sean M. McNabney.

    Will watching porn really make your sex life better?

    woman in her room on her bed watching laptop

    Pornography use can be related to less difficulty becoming aroused and an easier time achieving an orgasm, according to new research.

    Photo by CandyBox Images on Shutterstock

    In this study, researchers had 2,433 women from the United States and Hungary complete an anonymous survey, in which they provided demographic information and completed several assessments related to their sex lives. This study unearthed some very interesting observations that challenge much of the stereotypes and misconceptions people place around female porn viewing habits.

    Pornography use is more common in...

    Pornography use during masturbation was more common among pre-menopausal women, women who reported persistent anxiety or depression, non-heterosexual women, and women who had two or more partners.

    Pornography use during masturbation was also more popular among American women than women from Hungary.

    Positive outcomes related to pornography use can include...

    More frequent use of pornography was related to positive outcomes during masturbation including less difficulty becoming aroused, less orgasmic difficulty, greater time to orgasm, greater orgasmic pleasure, and a higher percent of time reaching orgasm.

    More frequent use of pornography for partnered sex was related to positive outcomes like less difficulty becoming aroused and greater time to orgasm.

    Pornography use does not negatively impact relationships as much as many people think.

    There was no association between pornography and sexual relationship satisfaction, which challenges the assumption that pornography is harmful to partnered sexual relationships.

    More frequent pornography use was not associated with lower sexual responsivity. In fact, pornography use during masturbation predicted great ease becoming aroused during partnered sex.

    The missing parameters of this study are important to note.

    The study did not assess whether some women perceive themselves as dependent upon (or addicted to) pornography in order to achieve orgasm. This is important to note because distress resulting from pornography use may independently interfere with the female sexual response cycle.

    Some other things impacted impaired sexual function in women that are worth taking note of, including lower levels of educational attainment and mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. Anxiety and depression were also associated with lower relationship/sexual satisfaction.

    It’s time to rethink how porn impacts our relationships

    woman in bed holding phone wearing headphones

    ​Audio porn is becoming more and more popular for its immersive and inclusive nature.

    Photo by popcorner on Shutterstock

    It's more common than ever for women to consume porn. Back in 2016, the average percentage of women who consumed porn was 26 percent worldwide. In 2018, that number was much higher, with 3 out of every 10 PornHub users identifying as female.

    While this may be surprising to some, it really shouldn't be considering the lengths this industry has gone to in order to become inclusive, accepting, and more appealing to people of all genders and sexual orientations.

    Visual porn platforms (such as PornHub) are still on top, but not for long.

    In 2019, there were over 42 billion visits to PornHub, one of the largest visual porn platforms around. This means there was an average of 115 million visits to the website per day. Their statistics outline that the amount of content available on the site at any given time that year would have taken 169 years to watch.

    Other visual pornography platforms have similar statistics, however there is a new kind of porn rising—and it's captivating the imagination of women, in particular.

    Audio porn is offering a more widely accepted, inclusive, and all-encompassing approach to sexual health and happiness.

    "Audio porn" has been around for longer than you may realize, with the first phone sex line being launched in 1977 by Gloria Leonard. The 2010s saw a rise in audio porn, with platforms like Quinn and Dipsea breaking onto the pornography scene in a big way. Now, in 2020, platforms like Audiodesires, Voxxx, and more are following suit.

    Audio porn offers a more in-depth, immersive, imaginative experience for women who previously found visual sex to be off-putting, offensive, or crude. More than that, it's making the concept of pornography more "acceptable" and appreciated in mainstream media, with more attention being paid to these new platforms from sources like Yahoo and the New York Times.

    Studies like this can alter misconceptions about how porn impacts our relationships.

    "Some readers may be relieved to learn that pornography use is fairly common among women and is unlikely to interfere with sexual functioning during partnered relationships. Other variables such as ongoing anxiety/depression or sexual relationship dissatisfaction appear to more consistently predict sexual problems," said McNabney.

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