5 ways to cope during a crisis when you can’t quit your job

A bit of planning goes a long way.

How to manage work when you are going through a crisis
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When Carole King's border collie went missing in July, she decided to quit her job and devote her time to finding her furry companion, People reported.


After a 57-day search, the Washington State woman was reunited with her dog.

We love this heartwarming story of love and perseverance. But how can you get through a personal crisis — and losing a beloved pet definitely counts as one — when taking time off from work or putting your career on hold isn't an option? Here, experts offer their tips for coping at work when you're going through a hardship.

Set realistic goals

Sometimes it's inevitable that what we go through outside of work affects our output or energy on the job. "You can't expect yourself to be performing at the same level as when you were at 100%," says Annie Varvaryan, Psy.D, a clinical psychologist. But the key is to be clear with your boss if your work — or your team's work — is going to be affected. "Don't hide it," says Kerri Twigg, a career coach and job search strategist. "See if you can bring in some extra support on some projects."

Surround yourself with support

Some people's tendency during a tough time is to isolate, notes Varvaryan. But it's important to "allow yourself to connect to people you trust or are close to," she says. Sometimes what we need most is someone to help validate our feelings, but it's OK if you don't feel comfortable sharing details with people you work with. If you're tight-lipped all day, try to connect with friends or loved ones when work is done, says Elizabeth Cohen, Ph.D., a New York City-based clinical psychologist.

Prioritize self-care

In the midst of a tough time, self-care can feel like a lofty, unrealistic goal. But experts agree that even the simplest acts can impact your well-being during a hardship. Twigg encourages packing "lunches that are healthy and nourishing" as a start.

Communicate

If you worked out a flexible schedule, such as coming in later than usual or leaving early to tend to what's going on in your personal life, be sure your manager knows how to reach you when you're not in the office. It's also important to let people know when you'll be offline and won't be checking email or texts. While it can be uncomfortable to have these talks upfront, being direct is often the best way to avoid added stress.

Take breaks

It may not be realistic to take a sabbatical from work, but that doesn't mean you can't take mini-breaks to restore and replenish you throughout the day. Twigg advises "blocking out 10 or 15 minutes in [a private] room to meditate or just sit in silence."

Reprinted with permission of Thrive Global. Read the original article.

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  • U.S. Navy holds patents for enigmatic inventions by aerospace engineer Dr. Salvatore Pais.
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China has reached a new record for nuclear fusion at 120 million degrees Celsius.

Credit: STR via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation

This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink.

China wants to build a mini-star on Earth and house it in a reactor. Many teams across the globe have this same bold goal --- which would create unlimited clean energy via nuclear fusion.

But according to Chinese state media, New Atlas reports, the team at the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has set a new world record: temperatures of 120 million degrees Celsius for 101 seconds.

Yeah, that's hot. So what? Nuclear fusion reactions require an insane amount of heat and pressure --- a temperature environment similar to the sun, which is approximately 150 million degrees C.

If scientists can essentially build a sun on Earth, they can create endless energy by mimicking how the sun does it.

If scientists can essentially build a sun on Earth, they can create endless energy by mimicking how the sun does it. In nuclear fusion, the extreme heat and pressure create a plasma. Then, within that plasma, two or more hydrogen nuclei crash together, merge into a heavier atom, and release a ton of energy in the process.

Nuclear fusion milestones: The team at EAST built a giant metal torus (similar in shape to a giant donut) with a series of magnetic coils. The coils hold hot plasma where the reactions occur. They've reached many milestones along the way.

According to New Atlas, in 2016, the scientists at EAST could heat hydrogen plasma to roughly 50 million degrees C for 102 seconds. Two years later, they reached 100 million degrees for 10 seconds.

The temperatures are impressive, but the short reaction times, and lack of pressure are another obstacle. Fusion is simple for the sun, because stars are massive and gravity provides even pressure all over the surface. The pressure squeezes hydrogen gas in the sun's core so immensely that several nuclei combine to form one atom, releasing energy.

But on Earth, we have to supply all of the pressure to keep the reaction going, and it has to be perfectly even. It's hard to do this for any length of time, and it uses a ton of energy. So the reactions usually fizzle out in minutes or seconds.

Still, the latest record of 120 million degrees and 101 seconds is one more step toward sustaining longer and hotter reactions.

Why does this matter? No one denies that humankind needs a clean, unlimited source of energy.

We all recognize that oil and gas are limited resources. But even wind and solar power --- renewable energies --- are fundamentally limited. They are dependent upon a breezy day or a cloudless sky, which we can't always count on.

Nuclear fusion is clean, safe, and environmentally sustainable --- its fuel is a nearly limitless resource since it is simply hydrogen (which can be easily made from water).

With each new milestone, we are creeping closer and closer to a breakthrough for unlimited, clean energy.

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