Building a Brain Like Ours

I don’t think we’ve conceptualized yet well enough how the brain gets its job done to abstract all of that activity in our brain into meaningful units to which we can then think about how to move those around to build a brain.

When will we be able to build a brain to act and think like us? That is so far off in the future in my opinion that it’s interesting to think about because it forces you to actually see what you have and to try to quantify it in a way that could be instantiated in an artifact. So that’s a very powerful intellectual exercise for sure, but the details of that are figuring out the fine connections that are going to underlie so many of the differences between all of us.


It is just a horrendous problem.  We can barely figure out the C. Elegans, a little worm that has a very small number of neurons where we have 13 billion plus trillions of interactions and so forth. 

So I think it’s a long way off and I don’t think we’ve conceptualized yet well enough how the brain gets its job done to abstract all of that activity in our brain into meaningful units to which we can then think about how to move those around to build a brain. 

I just think we’re too far away from that, but that doesn’t mean we don’t know a tremendous amount about the brain and how it does its work, which has exploded in the last 50 or 60 years, but it’s just beginning to.  

In Their Own Words is recorded in Big Think's studio.

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