New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Of course, it's all about where you move. The authors argue that it needs to be less populous regions.

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  • Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.
  • Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective.
  • Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model.
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COVID-19 amplified America’s devastating health gap. Can we bridge it?

The COVID-19 pandemic is making health disparities in the United States crystal clear. It is a clarion call for health care systems to double their efforts in vulnerable communities.

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Willie Mae Daniels makes melted cheese sandwiches with her granddaughter, Karyah Davis, 6, after being laid off from her job as a food service cashier at the University of Miami on March 17, 2020.

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated America's health disparities, widening the divide between the haves and have nots.
  • Studies show disparities in wealth, race, and online access have disproportionately harmed underserved U.S. communities during the pandemic.
  • To begin curing this social aliment, health systems like Northwell Health are establishing relationships of trust in these communities so that the post-COVID world looks different than the pre-COVID one.
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Experts fear Thanksgiving COVID spikes—Can you have your turkey and stay healthy too ?

Experts plead with Americans to keep gatherings limited this Thanksgiving, while families devise new ways to celebrate the holidays.

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  • Holiday travel and family gatherings will bolster America's already growing number of coronavirus cases, experts warn.
  • The CDC recommends families celebrating with people outside their quarantine households follow extra precautions.
  • For families staying physically distant, there remain many ways to connect with each other this Thanksgiving.
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    Using machine learning to track the pandemic’s impact on mental health

    Textual analysis of social media posts finds users' anxiety and suicide-risk levels are rising, among other negative trends.

    Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash
    Dealing with a global pandemic has taken a toll on the mental health of millions of people.
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    What ended the Black Death, history's worst pandemic

    The bubonic plague ravaged the world for centuries, killing up to 200 million people.

    A man dresses as a plague doctor at the Bannockburn Live event on June 28, 2014 in Stirling, Scotland.

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    Surprising Science
  • The Plague was the worst pandemic in history, killing up to 200 million people.
  • The disease spread through air, rats, and fleas, and decimated Europe for several centuries.
  • The pandemic eased with better sanitation, hygiene, and medical advancements but never completely disappeared.
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    Study warns of delayed flu outbreaks after pandemic ends

    The positive steps we are taking to prevent disease might have a negative side effect.

    Wearing a mask, staying in, and social distancing can help fight COVID and often leads to scenes such as this formerly busy street in Liverpool.

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    Surprising Science
    • A new study out of Princeton suggests that measures to prevent COVID-19 are also preventing certain other diseases.
    • The nature of seasonal diseases means that people who avoid them this year may just be putting it off, leading to a large wave later.
    • These estimates don't mean we should be less preventive now, only that we must be sure to take care in the future.
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    Remote education is decreasing anxiety, increasing wellbeing for some students

    A recent NIHR report found that students with previously low connectedness scores saw improvement in well-being and eased anxiety.

    A student raises her hand during a remote education session.

    Personal Growth
    • With coronavirus resurging in Europe and the United States, parents are worried about their children's well-being and mental health.
    • A report from the U.K.'s NIHR extends some hope; it found that students' mental health is improving while remote learning.
    • Parents will continue play an important role in supporting their children's mental health.
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