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As COVID-19 continues to spread worldwide, scientists are analyzing new ways to track it.
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How New York's largest hospital system is predicting COVID-19 spikes

Northwell Health is using insights from website traffic to forecast COVID-19 hospitalizations two weeks in the future.

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Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The machine-learning algorithm works by analyzing the online behavior of visitors to the Northwell Health website and comparing that data to future COVID-19 hospitalizations.
  • The tool, which uses anonymized data, has so far predicted hospitalizations with an accuracy rate of 80 percent.
  • Machine-learning tools are helping health-care professionals worldwide better constrain and treat COVID-19.
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7 expert perspectives on what COVID-19 means for the planet

At the height of the first wave, many people took heart from the drop in air pollution resulting from global lockdowns.

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Experts agree that the legacy of the COVID-19 pandemic will be with us for years, even after the immediate threat has passed.

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Telehealth will save lives—for as long as it has funding

The federal government and private insurers greatly increased Americans' telehealth access during the pandemic. Will these changes be permanent?

During COVID-19, most U.S. health care organizations managed to massively increase their virtual consultations, keeping patients and doctors safe.

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  • When telehealth visits began skyrocketing after the pandemic began, hospitals had to increase their number of virtual appointments by magnitudes. Most did it seamlessly.
  • Big Think spoke to Dr. Martin Doerfler, senior vice president of clinical strategy and development at Northwell Health, about this transition and how it benefited patients.
  • Telehealth has proven its value during the pandemic, but it might stop evolving unless the federal government redesigns the regulatory framework so that insurers cover it and patients can afford it.
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People in these countries think their government did a good job of dealing with the pandemic

Spoiler: Most people actually approved of their government's approach.

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Coronavirus
How well did your country respond to the pandemic?
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5 facts about positive affect for 2021

After the unrelenting negativity of 2020, we may need a refresher on the benefits of a positive affect.

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Personal Growth
  • 2021 won't reset the ills of 2020, but for many it's become a symbol of a fresh start.
  • A positive affect is contagious, correlates with better health, and leads to more supportive social connections.
  • However, positivity must be balanced with realism if it is to improve our well-being.
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    How to have a constructive conversation with vaccine skeptics

    Jonathan Berman wants us to have better dialogues.

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    Coronavirus
    • In his book, "Anti-vaxxers," science educator Jonathan Berman aims to foster better conversations about vaccines.
    • While the anti-vax movement in America has grown, more Americans now say they'll get a COVID-19 vaccine.
    • In this Big Think interview, Berman explains why he's offering an ear to the anti-vax movement.
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