Will Big Data Make Free Will Irrelevant?

What does it mean when Big Data can make a prediction that someone has a high likelihood of committing a crime? Should the criminal justice system intervene?

In Crime and Punishment, the Russian student Raskolnikov kills a pawnbroker to test his Nietzschean hypothesis that certain people transcend morality and therefore have the right to commit murder. 


In Albert Camus's novel, The Stranger, Meursault confiscates a revolver from his friend Raymond with the ostensible purpose of preventing Raymond from doing anything impulsive with the weapon. Meursault then proceeds to shoot an Arab man, seemingly without motive or emotion.

It would be an interesting test for a smart computer to read these two novels and recommend a possible intervention in each case. Raskolnikov's premeditated murder would be relatively easy to predict, as Dostoevsky's antihero plans every aspect of his crime over many pages. A very sophisticated algorithm, on the other hand, would be required to detect Meursault's lack of empathy and judge his predilection for murder accordingly. 

Of course, Raskolnikov and Meursault are fictional characters, but these scenarios are far from absurd. After all, Big Data is emerging as a powerful tool for law enforcement, one that might be utilized not only to solve crimes but to prevent them in the first place. 

In the video below, Kenneth Cukier, the data editor of The Economist, considers the implications of Big Data's ability to predict whether someone has a high likelihood of committing a crime. "If I could tell with a 98 percent statistical accuracy that you are likely to shoplift in the next 12 months," Cukier tells Big Think, "public safety requires that I interact."

So what does this interaction mean? Typically you have to commit a crime before you are penalized for that crime, Cukier points out. However, maybe Raskolnikov gets a knock at his door. It's a social worker arriving to offer services. "We’d like to help you."

Of course, this kind of intervention has its costs. Raskolnikov would become stigmatized in the eyes of his peers, or his school teachers. And after all, he hasn't done anything wrong yet. Data analysis might tell us that he is likely to kill, but doesn't he still have free will?

Watch the video here:

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

4 reasons Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for universal basic income

In his final years, Martin Luther King, Jr. become increasingly focused on the problem of poverty in America.

(Photo by J. Wilds/Keystone/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Despite being widely known for his leadership role in the American civil rights movement, Martin Luther King, Jr. also played a central role in organizing the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.
  • The campaign was one of the first to demand a guaranteed income for all poor families in America.
  • Today, the idea of a universal basic income is increasingly popular, and King's arguments in support of the policy still make a good case some 50 years later.
Keep reading Show less

Why avoiding logical fallacies is an everyday superpower

10 of the most sandbagging, red-herring, and effective logical fallacies.

Photo credit: Miguel Henriques on Unsplash
Personal Growth
  • Many an otherwise-worthwhile argument has been derailed by logical fallacies.
  • Sometimes these fallacies are deliberate tricks, and sometimes just bad reasoning.
  • Avoiding these traps makes disgreeing so much better.
Keep reading Show less
Videos
  • Facebook and Google began as companies with supposedly noble purposes.
  • Creating a more connected world and indexing the world's information: what could be better than that?
  • But pressure to return value to shareholders came at the expense of their own users.
Keep reading Show less