The Economics of the Singularity

How will the Singularity impact economic productivity?

The Singularity - a potential future event that represents computers overtaking human intelligence - is one of the most talked about ideas on Big Think. However, here is a perspective that we don't often see. How will the Singularity impact economic productivity?


You will get $40 trillion just by reading this essay and understanding what it says.

That's what Ray Kurzweil famously wrote in his 2001 essay, "The Law of Accelerating Returns." Now that's a bit hard to grasp. On the other hand, here is how Robin Hanson, an economist at George Mason University in Washington, D.C., put it to NBC News:

The past two singularities — the Agricultural and Industrial revolutions — led to a doubling in economic productivity every 1,000 and 15 years, respectively, said Robin Hanson, an economist at George Mason University in Washington, D.C., who is writing a book about the future singularity. But once machines become as smart as man, the economy will double every week or month.

Denmark has the flattest work hierarchy in the world

"It's about having employees that are empowered."

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Denmark may be the birthplace of the Lego tower, but its workplace hierarchy is the flattest in the world.

According to the World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report 2018, the nation tops an index measuring "willingness to delegate authority" at work, beating 139 other countries.

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Want a happy, satisfying relationship? Psychologists say the best way is to learn to take a joke.

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