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Tracking Jihad Jane

March 12, 2010, 6:46 AM
America was stunned yesterday by the revelations that a suburban Pennsylvania woman, aka "Jihad Jane," was trying to join militant jihadists. But for net “vigilantes" it was old news. But for net “vigilantes’ it was old news. Since her arrests, at least one “web sleuths” has claimed to have alerted the authorities to Colleen LaRose’s alleged attempts to raise funds and recruit comrades to fight her very own jihad. But if her activities have been being monitored by groups like JawaReport, Quoth the Raven and the YouTube Smackdown Corps, then why didn’t the feds take action sooner? "It was pretty hard to miss her," Robert, an administrator of SmackdownCorps.com told ABC News. "She made lots and lots of encouraging comments on Islamic videos. The trick was to find her new user name after we suspended each account. She was very persistent. But again, she made it easy to find her." Robert said as he followed LaRose on YouTube, he witnessed her descent into violent extremism. "In my eyes, Jihad Jane was a product of YouTube. I watched her become more radicalized and her influence grew all on YouTube. YouTube provided an excellent platform for her to spread her message of hate and she used it well. She was seen as, and portrayed herself on YouTube as a mother figure to the young Islamists and they respected her and looked up to her," he claimed.
 

Tracking Jihad Jane

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