What is Big Think?  

We are Big Idea Hunters…

We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think is an evolving roadmap to the best thinking on the planet — the ideas that can help you think flexibly and act decisively in a multivariate world.

A word about Big Ideas and Themes — The architecture of Big Think

Big ideas are lenses for envisioning the future. Every article and video on bigthink.com and on our learning platforms is based on an emerging “big idea” that is significant, widely relevant, and actionable. We’re sifting the noise for the questions and insights that have the power to change all of our lives, for decades to come. For example, reverse-engineering is a big idea in that the concept is increasingly useful across multiple disciplines, from education to nanotechnology.

Themes are the seven broad umbrellas under which we organize the hundreds of big ideas that populate Big Think. They include New World Order, Earth and Beyond, 21st Century Living, Going Mental, Extreme Biology, Power and Influence, and Inventing the Future.

Big Think Features:

12,000+ Expert Videos

1

Browse videos featuring experts across a wide range of disciplines, from personal health to business leadership to neuroscience.

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World Renowned Bloggers

2

Big Think’s contributors offer expert analysis of the big ideas behind the news.

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Big Think Edge

3

Big Think’s Edge learning platform for career mentorship and professional development provides engaging and actionable courses delivered by the people who are shaping our future.

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Today’s Theme

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Today’s Big Idea

Think Like a Child

Be practical when it comes to your goals: think like a child, says Stephen Dubner, the co-author, with economist Steven Levitt, of Freakonomics and their latest best seller, Think Like a Freak.

"One argument that we make is that we could all benefit a little bit from thinking more like children," Dubner told Big Think. "One of the most powerful pieces of thinking like a child that we argue is thinking small."

For more on why thinking small will help you leave a mark on the world, watch this video from Big Think's interview with Dubner.

  1. 1 Want to Make a Difference in the ...
  2. 2 Exercising Your Imagination
  3. 3 Why Nature is the Best Business S...
  4. 4 The Ultimate Competitive Edge
Yesterday’s Theme
  1. Want to Make a Difference in the World? Think Small

    Want to Make a Difference in the World? Think Small

    Stephen Dubner on Why Thinking Small Leads to Big Changes

    Read More…
  2. Exercising Your Imagination

    Exercising Your Imagination

    10 Steps to Creativity and Boosting Intuitive Awareness

    Read More…
  3. Why Nature is the Best Business School

    Why Nature is the Best Business School

    "I Went to the Woods to Become a Creative Problem Solver."

    Read More…
  4. The Ultimate Competitive Edge

    The Ultimate Competitive Edge

    Why the US has China Beat When It Comes to Imagination

    Read More…

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