Shutterstock_85029457_scaled

IdeaFeed

Tailgating: Good for You, Good for the Community

Article written by guest writer Kecia Lynn

What's the Latest Development?

It's probably fitting that a study about the venerable institution of tailgating would come out of the University of Notre Dame, home of the Fighting Irish. Cultural anthropologist John Sherry and colleagues examined their university's tailgate parties -- and their rivals' -- as well as those at other universities. Their recently completed research shows that tailgating parties, far from being a nuisance, "build community, nurture tradition, and...contribute to a college or university brand." 

What's the Big Idea?

Tailgating is primarily associated with football, a sport that represents many things that make America unique. However, anthropologically speaking, Sherry takes it all the way back to ancient Roman customs associated with harvest festivals, when people put on one last huge party (or parties) before the advent of winter. By bringing out their grills and comfortable furniture, tailgaters create a "consumption encampment" that also allows them to experience game day in an active way. "Tailgating is all fan-generated. They understand it as a contribution to the team's victory. They are literally surrounding the stadium with their expressions of loyalty and love, and it's much more communal."

R. Peterkin / Shutterstock.com

comments powered by Disqus
×