Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered that exposure to second-hand smoke could increase your risk of developing dementia and other brain-eating impairments.

The research highlighted a 44% increase in risk of cognitive impairment when exposed to high levels of second-hand smoke.

While previous studies identified active smoking as a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia, most were focused on children and adolescents. "This is the first large-scale study to conclude that second-hand smoke exposure could lead to dementia and other neurological problems in adults," according to Cambridge. 

 

The authors proposed a number of possible explanations including an increased risk of heart disease and stroke which directly linked to matters of the brain.