We have never learned how to use instructional media in our schools in any predictable or systematic way. An even greater problem is that we have not learned how to deal with the educational effects of modern technology outside the classroom. We live in a society in which school is one place to learn, but not the only place to learn. Machine-aided tasks are increasing at an exponential rate, and modern technology has much to contribute to the management of the classroom, as well as to the substance of learning. Nevertheless, schools and teachers act as spectators to the passing trends, while technology leaps forward, leaving the onlookers behind.

Allen, D. W. (1992). Schools for a new century: A conservative approach to radical school reform (p. 126). New York, NY: Greenwood Publishing.

I ran across this quote today. It’s from 1992 - the era of the laserdisc. The fact that two decades later this still rings true for so many of our schools and classrooms is pretty sad.

What's it going to take for us to start taking seriously the power and potential of learning technologies? How much more evidence do we need?

Image credit: Laserdisc!