George Washington Carver (1861 or 1864-1943), who most people know for discovering 100 different uses for the peanut, was an American scientist and inventor. Born into slavery during the Civil War, Carver was able to secure a good education in the years after his freedom, became a reputed educator, and eventually settled at Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute, where he taught for 47 years. An agricultural genius, Carver's work helped promote better planting practices in the South. Carver received much acclaimed for his findings and talents; Time magazine deemed him "a black Leonardo" in 1941.

"Fear of something is at the root of hate for others, and hate within will eventually destroy the hater. Keep your thoughts free from hate, and you need have no fear from those who hate you."

 Quoted in Linda O. McMurray, George Washington Carver: Scientist and Symbol (Oxford University Press, 1982), p. 107 

(via WikiQuote)