Steven Pinker Redefines Moral Relativism

Psychologist and Linguist

Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. Currently Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Pinker has also taught at Stanford and MIT. His research on vision, language, and social relations has won prizes from the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Institution of Great Britain, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, and the American Psychological Association. He has also received eight honorary doctorates, several teaching awards at MIT and Harvard, and numerous prizes for his books The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Better Angels of Our Nature. He is Chair of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary, and often writes for The New York Times, Time, and other publications. He has been named Humanist of the Year, Prospect magazine’s “The World’s Top 100 Public Intellectuals,” Foreign Policy’s “100 Global Thinkers,” and Time magazine’s “The 100 Most Influential People in the World Today.”

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TRANSCRIPT

Steven Pinker: I think that one general attitude towards solving our problems is to keep in mind that not all problems have to have a moralistic solution; that often, things that improve the value of life and that, in that sense, are highly moral outcomes may not have come about through moral saber rattling, posturing, persuasion.  So to be concrete, let’s say you’ve got a problem that needs to be solved.  A doctor makes an error, sends the wrong drug into a patient and the patient dies.  There are two ways of solving that problem.  One is you could punish the doctor and have a policy that any doctor that is careless in the future will face severe penalties.  That would be a kind of moralistic solution. Or you could design the IV valves so that you can’t snap together the wrong drug with the wrong patient; that no matter how careless you are, you just can’t have that bad outcome.  Probably the second one is . . . will save more lives than the first.  It won’t give us that bittersweet glow of having punished the careless.  On the other hand, more people might be alive.  I think that probably a lot of improvement in the human condition – more than we acknowledge – has come about through non-moralistic improvements than we commonly acknowledge.  If you ask who saved the most lives in the past generation, one answer might be Norman Borlaug, winner of a 1970 Nobel Peace Prize – someone that no one has heard of.  He’s the father of the green revolution.  He devised streams of crops and methods of agriculture that are more disease resistant, more energy efficient.  He probably deserves credit for savings tens, maybe hundreds of millions of lives.  No one’s heard of him.  Why?  Because he wasn’t a moral crusader.  He was a technologist; but he accomplished wonderful things.  Many of the problems that we face might be solved . . .  I don’t want to say all of them.  There is a role for Martin Luther King and abolitionists of slavery and so on.  But there is also a role, I think, for the engineer, for the scientist, for the planner, for the policy maker who figures out how people can get more of what they want given the resources that they have.


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